Common English Flowers

Take a walk through an English garden and discover flowers that are common not only in England, but in North America as well. The hardiness zones in England correspond to the same zones in the United States. England has four zones from 7 to 10A, with most of the country in zone 8. This is equivalent to the southern United States as far south as parts of northern Florida.

Lavender

Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) is also known as English Lavender or true lavender, and is a member of the mint family. The plant grows from 1 1/2 to 3 feet tall and 1 1/2 to 3 feet wide. Gray-green leaves turn to green-purple in the summer and silver-green to gray-bronze in the winter. Blue-purple, lavender, violet-blue or white-pink flowers grow at the tips of the stems and bloom from late June through August or September. Plant lavender in full sun or partial shade in soil that is moist and well-drained. The plant is hardy in USDA zones 5 to 9 and in zones 7 to 9 in the United Kingdom.

Montbretia

Montbretia (Crocosmia X crocosmiiflora) is also known as crocosmia. It is a member of the iris family and grows up to 4 feet tall. The plant grows from corms, which are similar to bulbs and measure about 1 inch in diameter. Pale-green, strap-like leaves measure from 2 to 3 inches long and 1 to 2 inches wide. Red, orange or yellow funnel-shaped flowers measure 2 inches across and grow in long clusters on arching spikes. Plant montbretia in full sun or partial shade in soil that is moist and well drained. The plant is hardy in USDA and United Kingdom zones 6 to 9.

Large Periwinkle

Large periwinkle (Vinca major) is a member of the dogbane family. The plant is hardy in USDA and United Kingdom zones 7 to 9, and likes full sun or partial shade and a rich, moist soil. Dark green oval or heart-shaped leaves grow from 2 to 3 inches long on stems up to 12 inches long. The plant spreads along the ground, takes root and produces new leaves, which spread the plant even further. The violet-blue, funnel-shaped flowers measure 2 inches across. They bloom profusely in the spring and less often in the summer.

Snowdrop

Snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis) grows up to 9 inches long and 6 inches wide. White, bell-shaped, 1-inch-long flowers grow at the top of the stems, and bloom from January to March. Narrow, linear leaves 4 inches long grow around the base of the plant. Plant snowdrop in full sun or partial shade in a moist, rich, well-drained soil. The plant is hardy in USDA zones 3 to 7 and in zone 7 in the United Kingdom.

Keywords: English flowers, English gardens, common English flowers

About this Author

Regina Sass has been a writer for 10 years, penning articles for publications in the real estate and retail industries. Her online experience includes writing, advertising and editing for an educational website. Sass is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists.