How to Care for Heuchera

Overview

Heuchera, known as coral bells, provides the best of both worlds. Gorgeous, variegated foliage in every description of rich colors, and pretty bell-shaped flowers on graceful, summer-blooming spikes are the gift of these easy-to-cultivate perennials.

Step 1

Choose a site with well-drained soil. The heuchera dislikes wet roots. Full sun to part shade is preferable but will vary depending on the specific cultivar.

Step 2

Prepare the site by working the soil to a depth of 12 inches. Amend with organic matter to provide nutrients for the coral bells.

Step 3

Dig a hole deep enough to accommodate the roots with the crown just below the soil line. Heucheras must have crown-to-soil contact in order to grow properly.

Step 4

Plant huecheras with the crown just below soil level and firm around the plant.

Step 5

Fertilize with a balanced perennial fertilizer in spring to encourage active growth and summer blooms.

Step 6

Mulch around heuchera prior to winter after the growing season to protect the plant from frost.

Step 7

Dig and divide heuchera every few years to create new plants and revive the soil for new growth. Use a shovel to dig carefully around the root system and lift from the ground. Amend the soil with compost. Divide the mature plant, ensuring that each crown piece has roots attached to it, and replant each division 1 to 2 feet apart to allow for mature growth.

Things You'll Need

  • Organic matter
  • Balanced fertilizer
  • Mulch
  • Shovel

References

  • Michigan State University Extension, Heuchera sanguinea--Coral Bells
  • University of Illinois Extension, Homeowner's Column: The New Look in Heucheras
  • University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension, Division of Agriculture, Plant of the Week: Coralbells
Keywords: care for heuchera, heuchera care, cultivating heuchera

About this Author

Desirae Roy began writing in 2009. After earning certification as an interpreter for the deaf, Roy earned a Bachelor of Arts in elementary education from Eastern Washington University. Part of her general studies included a botany course leading to a passion for the natural world.