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How to Save Hibiscus Seeds

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How to Save Hibiscus Seeds

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Overview

Hibiscus plants are prized for their large, beautiful flowers that come in a range of colors and shapes. The foliage is also striking, with large, glossy, green leaves on tall, slender stems. The plant grows best in warmer, more humid areas, usually from hardiness zone 8 through 10, but can be grown as an indoor ornamental. Hibiscus can be grown from seed, which can either be purchased or collected from seed pods from parent plants. With just a few household items, you can start your own hibiscus plants.

Step 1

Watch the hibiscus seed pods carefully to pick them at the proper time. Seeds collected too early may not sprout later. Too late, and the seeds will be have already been scattered.

Step 2

Pick the seed pods that result after the flowers have withered and died. When ready, they will be papery and brittle with the seeds inside.

Step 3

Collect hibiscus seed pods that result after the flowers have withered and died. When ready, they will be papery and brittle with the seeds inside. Place them whole in a paper bag and label it for future reference.

Step 4

Seal the bag and allow it to sit for a couple of weeks in a well-ventilated place. This will allow the seeds to finish ripening.

Step 5

Once the seed pods have ripened, remove them from the bag and place them in a large plastic bowl. Break the pods apart with your hands to release the seeds. Remove any chaff from the seeds.

Step 6

Separate the seeds and place them in a small envelope or container. Store your seeds in a cool, dry place until planting time.

Tips and Warnings

  • If your hibiscus flowers were pollinated from unknown sources, the resulting plant and flowers may not resemble the parent plant.

Things You'll Need

  • Paper bag
  • Marker

References

  • Wintersown.org
  • The New Perennial Club
Keywords: collect hibiscus seeds, grow hibiscus seeds, store hibiscus seeds

About this Author

Located in Jacksonville, Fla, Frank Whittemore has been a writer and content strategist for over 15 years, providing corporate communications services to Fortune 500 companies. Whittemore writes on topics that stem from his fascination with nature, the environment, science, medicine and technology.