Facts About Daisy Flowers

Facts About Daisy Flowers image by BigTallGuy: Flickr.com, Cmpryor: Flickr.com, ConspiracyofHappiness: Flickr.com, Tom Hilton: Flickr.com, BarefootGardener: Flickr.com
Facts About Daisy Flowers image by BigTallGuy: Flickr.com, Cmpryor: Flickr.com, ConspiracyofHappiness: Flickr.com, Tom Hilton: Flickr.com, BarefootGardener: Flickr.com

Overview

There are different varieties of wild and domesticated daisies. They are a common garden annual and roadside plant and are also found in open fields surrounded by tall grass. Often used in wildflower bouquets, daisies offer a delicate scent and a vast array of colors.

Black-eyed Susan in full bloom

Types

Two common varieties of daisies are the Shasta daisy (Chrysanthemum maximum) and the gerbera daisy (Gerbera Jamesonii). Other varieties of daisies include black-eyed Susan, feverfew, echinacea and fleabane (Blue Beauty).

Bright pink gerbera daisy, one of many colors available in this variety

Growing

Daisies require well-drained, fertile soil. Seeds are planted to 1/16 of an inch and lightly covered with soil. Germination will depend on the variety sown. Daisies will bloom from late spring until early fall.

Feverfew, considered an herb that aids in fever reduction

Care

Fertilizing is required monthly. Regular deep morning watering should be done when the soil dries. To encourage more blooms, deadhead (remove spent blooms) on a regular basis.

Bright blue blooms of fleabane, also known as Blue Beauty

Benefits

The wide varieties of sizes and colors make daisies a favorite cut flower. Daisies also stay fresher longer than most other cut flowers; depending on the variety, that may be 10 to 14 days.

Pink and white echinacea blooms with large amber to yellow centers

Warnings

Daisies are susceptible to a fungal infection, Sclerotinia (white mold), which can be prevented by ensuring that soil is well drained. Common pests that can be treated with insecticide are spider mites, caterpillars, leaf miners and thrips.

References

  • Gerbera Daisy
  • Shasta Daisy
  • Master Gardeners
Keywords: daisy flowers, Shasta daisy, gerbera daisy

About this Author

Currently residing in Myrtle Beach, SC, Tammy Curry began writing agricultural and frugal living articles in 2004. Her articles have appeared in the Mid-Atlantic Farm Chronicle and Country Family Magazine. Ms. Curry has also written SEO articles for textbroker.com. She holds an associate's degree in science from Jefferson College of Health Sciences.

Photo by: BigTallGuy: Flickr.com, Cmpryor: Flickr.com, ConspiracyofHappiness: Flickr.com, Tom Hilton: Flickr.com, BarefootGardener: Flickr.com