Bulbs That Bloom in Spring

Spring bulbs are some of the first flowers to emerge from the winter thaw every year. These easy-to-grow plants look best in naturalized plantings and come back year after year. Just as one type of bulb dies back, another type pushes up for its turn. Bulbs also make great container plants.

Crocus

Plant crocus in the spring for blooming in late winter or early spring. Crocus can often be seen emerging from snow still on the ground. They look good in rock gardens, beds and borders, containers and along sidewalks. Reaching a height of 4 to 6 inches, crocus are available in white, blue, purple, yellow and multi-colors. Plant them 3 to 4 inches deep and 3 inches apart in full sun. Use a general purpose fertilizer. To prolong the blooming season, plant species crocus and hybrid crocus. Species crocus bloom earlier than the hybrid. The hybrid crocus are known for large flowers.

Daffodils

Plant daffodils, available in yellow, white, pink and multi-colors, in the fall for early spring blooming. Plant the smaller species of daffodils 3 to 5 inches deep and 4 to 5 inches apart in full sun. Use a general purpose fertilizer. The larger species should be planted 6 inches deep and 6 inches apart. Daffodils need to be dug up and divided every four years. The divided bulbs can be replanted right away or stored for the following fall planting.

Hyacinths

Plant hyacinths in the fall or force them indoors in the winter. They will bloom in early to mid-spring when planted outdoors. If you like the strong fragrance of hyacinths, plant them in pots next to the front door for arriving visitors. For a sweet fragrance in the home, force hyacinths in a vase with pebbles and water. Outside, these bulbs looks best in beds and borders or in rock gardens as well as containers. Hyacinths grow to a height of 10 to 12 inches. Plant 6 inches deep and 6 to 9 inches apart in full sun. Use a general purpose fertilizer.

Tulips

Plant tulips in fall for a mid-spring display of color. Tulips and daffodils make great partners. Just as daffodils are dying back, tulips are starting to bloom. Nobody will notice the unsightly daffodil leaves, because they'll be looking at the beautiful tulips. Plant them 3 to 5 inches deep and 4 to 5 inches apart in full sun. Use a general purpose fertilizer. They are available in white, yellow, red, pink, purple, orange and multi-colors.

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About this Author

Brenda Reeves started writing in 1979. Specializing in gardening topics, her articles appear on numerous Web sites, including eHow. Reeves has a Bachelor of Arts in English and creative writing from California State University, Northridge.