Which Pine Trees Grow Fast?

Pine trees are desirable for their evergreen color, fragrant needles and interesting seed cones. Many are commonly used as Christmas trees. The Pinus species of trees varies widely, from the ancient bristlecone pine to pine trees that grow fast and are often used as either a specimen tree or to form hedges, windbreaks or privacy screens.

Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus)

This pine is one of the fastest-growing pines, according the University of Tennessee Extension Service. This hardy tree thrives on moist soil that is rich in organic matter and does best in full sunlight. The Eastern white pine, which is desirable in part for its attractive, blue-green needles, can grow to heights of 80 feet in the home landscape and is found primarily in U.S. Department of Agriculture growing zones 3 through 8.

Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda)

This is the fastest-growing pine in the Southern part of the U.S., according to the Arbor Day Foundation website, and is often used for screening purposes by landscapers and home gardeners. The tree features dark green, glossy needles and large, reddish-brown cones that can grow up to half a foot in length. The loblolly pine grows best in USDA hardiness zones 6 through 9 and is tolerant of drought conditions and a wide range of soil types. In the wild, this tree can grow to heights of over 100 feet, but is usually smaller in home landscapes.

Mondell Pine (Pinus eldarica)

Pinus eldarica grows rapidly as a young tree, according to University of Florida extension service. The tree, which has densely packed, long, soft green needles, can quickly reach heights of 40 feet or more. The mondell pine is hardy and can grow in any type of soil as long as the soil is well-drained. In fact, this tree can tolerate dry conditions better than many other pine trees. Pinus eldarica thrives in full sun in USDA growing zones 6 through 8 and makes an excellent screen plant.

Keywords: fast growing pines, large pine trees, pinus species growth

About this Author

April Sanders has been a professional writer since 1998. Previously, she worked as an educator and currently writes academic research content for EBSCO publishing and elementary reading curriculum for Compass Publishing. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in social psychology from the University of Washington and a master's degree in information sciences and technology in education from Mansfield University.