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How to Prune Lemon Trees

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Cruccone: Flickr.com

Lemon trees are fruit-bearing trees that usually grow in warm environments. Although it is not necessary to prune your lemon tree, it allows for more healthy growth to begin and keeps the weight of old, dead branches from stunting the tree.

Start pruning at the end of winter or the beginning of spring, before new buds begin to bloom. Wear gloves while pruning and have a partner spot you if you are using a ladder.

Identify dead branches that need to be trimmed. Dead branches will stop growing leaves and the bark will turn dark brown or black. Trim off any branches that appear dead with your pruning shears, but only prune to the area where the color begins to darken on the branch.

  • Lemon trees are fruit-bearing trees that usually grow in warm environments.
  • Trim off any branches that appear dead with your pruning shears, but only prune to the area where the color begins to darken on the branch.

Focus on trimming to clear the center of the tree so it can grow outward and upward. Trim any branches that seem tangled together or are growing crisscrossed with your pruning shears.

Don't overprune. Less is more when it comes to pruning. Only remove branches that appear dead or tangled.

Remove all cuttings from the area. This will allow the tree to have ample sunlight and water absorption from the ground around the lemon tree. You can mulch or discard these cuttings.

  • Focus on trimming to clear the center of the tree so it can grow outward and upward.
  • Trim any branches that seem tangled together or are growing crisscrossed with your pruning shears.

Prune Large Trees

Locate all dead branches with no leaves or any signs of buds when the tree is dormant; the wood is usually brittle, whereas live branches have some flexibility. Wearing safety eyewear and protective gloves, make a cut on the underside of the branch you are removing approximately 18 inches from the tree’s trunk, using a pruning saw. If the branch is larger than 4 inches thick, use a chainsaw. Create a second cut slightly farther out on the branch from the first cut. This time cut through the branch from above. Examine joints on branches to help determine which live branches to thin. Cut away branches that make it hard for you to walk under the tree or get under it with the lawn mower. As you raise the crown, keep two-thirds of the entire tree as crown and one-third as trunk. Clean your saws with disinfectant after you prune each tree to help prevent the spread of disease from one tree to another. Mix one part bleach to nine parts water. Rub that mixture on the saw blades and let it set for a couple minutes.

  • Locate all dead branches with no leaves or any signs of buds when the tree is dormant; the wood is usually brittle, whereas live branches have some flexibility.
  • Wearing safety eyewear and protective gloves, make a cut on the underside of the branch you are removing approximately 18 inches from the tree’s trunk, using a pruning saw.

Prune Large Trees

Locate all dead branches with no leaves or any signs of buds when the tree is dormant; the wood is usually brittle, whereas live branches have some flexibility. Wearing safety eyewear and protective gloves, make a cut on the underside of the branch you are removing approximately 18 inches from the tree’s trunk, using a pruning saw. If the branch is larger than 4 inches thick, use a chainsaw. Create a second cut slightly farther out on the branch from the first cut. This time cut through the branch from above. Examine joints on branches to help determine which live branches to thin. Cut away branches that make it hard for you to walk under the tree or get under it with the lawn mower. As you raise the crown, keep two-thirds of the entire tree as crown and one-third as trunk. Clean your saws with disinfectant after you prune each tree to help prevent the spread of disease from one tree to another. Mix one part bleach to nine parts water. Rub that mixture on the saw blades and let it set for a couple minutes.

  • Locate all dead branches with no leaves or any signs of buds when the tree is dormant; the wood is usually brittle, whereas live branches have some flexibility.
  • Wearing safety eyewear and protective gloves, make a cut on the underside of the branch you are removing approximately 18 inches from the tree’s trunk, using a pruning saw.

Tip

Never break or bend dead branches off with your hands.

Warning

Always wear gloves while pruning with shears.

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