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Why Are Roses So Expensive?

By Lee Morgan ; Updated July 21, 2017
Roses are expensive mostly because of their popularity.

If you have ever wandered down to the local florist to buy your sweetheart a bouquet of roses, you are aware of the high price of these beautiful flowers, especially compared with the price of many other kinds of flowers. There are several reasons why roses are so expensive. Understanding these reasons might make you feel better about paying more the next time you purchase them.

Love Connection

Roses are known throughout the world as a symbol of love, and giving roses indicates that you have special feelings for a person. Unless you know that your beloved prefers another flower, you can't go wrong with roses. This identification of roses with love helps to make them more expensive.

Popularity

Supply and demand are key to price setting, and the demand for roses is very high. Roses are one of the most popular flowers in the world, probably because of their sweet smell and variety of colors and sizes. Also, unlike some other flowers such as springtime tulips or Christmas poinsettias, roses are not identified with a particular season; they are in demand year-round. High demand keeps prices higher than that of many other flowers.

Rose Oil

Pure rose essential oil is used as an antidepressant, antiseptic and aphrodisiac, among other things. It is the most expensive of the essential oils; pure essential rose oil can sell for more than $70 for a bottle containing six-hundredths of an ounce. Since the rose produces so little oil, it takes 1,000 pounds of rose petals to produce an ounce of pure essential oil.

Valentine’s Day

The reason you might be paying top dollar for roses could have something to do with the time of year. Valentine’s Day is a traditional time to give roses, and florists know that lovers are willing to spend whatever it takes to send roses. In addition, since Valentine's Day is in the winter, at least in America, florists have to import the roses from warmer climates, and this adds to the cost.

 

About the Author

 

Lee Morgan is a fiction writer and journalist. His writing has appeared for more than 15 years in many news publications including the "Tennesseean," the "Tampa Tribune," "West Hawaii Today," the "Honolulu Star Bulletin" and the "Dickson Herald," where he was sports editor. He holds a Bachelor of Science in mass communications from Middle Tennessee State University.