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How to Transplant Honeysuckle Vines

By Kathryn Hatter
Transplant honeysuckle vines while the plant is dormant.
Wild Honeysuckle 1 image by DelB from <a href='http://www.fotolia.com'>Fotolia.com</a>

The energetic honeysuckle vine often grows so abundantly that it becomes invasive in a growing area, taking over other plants more than you may desire. When you wish to move honeysuckle to a different growing area, you must transplant honeysuckle vines when they are dormant in the autumn. Because honeysuckle is a tough and sturdy plant, it will easily withstand the transplant process and return to grow in its new area when the next growing season begins in the spring.

Prepare the new growing location for the honeysuckle vine before you dig the plant from its soil. Dig a hole in a sunny spot, making the hole deep enough to plant the honeysuckle at the same depth as it is currently growing.

Spread the tarp near the honeysuckle vine to enable you to transfer the vine directly onto the tarp for transporting it.

Cut back the honeysuckle vine with the pruning shears to remove approximately one-third of the entire growth of the vine before you transplant it. This pruning will make the transplant process easier.

Insert the tip of the shovel into the soil approximately 6 inches away from the center of the plant. Push the shovel all the way into the soil and remove it. Continue repositioning the shovel to make a circle around the entire plant. Angle the shovel beneath the plant roots to dig the honeysuckle out of the soil and place the honeysuckle onto the tarp.

Carry the honeysuckle vine in the tarp to the prepared planting hole and carefully place the plant into the hole. Spread the roots in the hole and fill the hole with soil to transplant the honeysuckle vine. Pat the soil down firmly with your hands around the plant.

Provide a thorough watering of the honeysuckle vine immediately after you finish transplanting it. Keep the soil evenly moist during the first three to four weeks after transplanting the vine to help it acclimate to the move.

 

About the Author

 

Kathryn Hatter is a veteran home-school educator, as well as an accomplished gardener, quilter, crocheter, cook, decorator and digital graphics creator. As a regular contributor to Natural News, many of Hatter's Internet publications focus on natural health and parenting. Hatter has also had publication on home improvement websites such as Redbeacon.