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How to Care for a Cypress Lemon Plant

?The lemon cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa Goldcrest) is a cultivar of the striking Monterey cypress, native to the California coast. With softly scented, yellow to lime foliage, it grows in a narrow, columnar shape to 16 fee in height. Although it is sold outside of its hardiness zones as a houseplant, the lemon cypress generally won’t thrive in dry, indoor air. Lemon cypress trees should be planted in full sun in USDA hardiness zones 7a to 10b.

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  • The lemon cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa Goldcrest) is a cultivar of the striking Monterey cypress, native to the California coast.
  • Although it is sold outside of its hardiness zones as a houseplant, the lemon cypress generally won’t thrive in dry, indoor air.

?Stake the young lemon cypress if the planting site is exposed to high winds.

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  • The lemon cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa Goldcrest) is a cultivar of the striking Monterey cypress, native to the California coast.
  • Although it is sold outside of its hardiness zones as a houseplant, the lemon cypress generally won’t thrive in dry, indoor air.

Water the lemon cypress when the top 2 inches of soil is dry. Water slowly and deeply. A soaker hose set for two to three hours will suffice. Water more frequently during periods of hot weather.

Fertilize the lemon cypress in the spring. Use a 10-8-6 granular fertilizer, at the rate suggested on the package. Rake the soil, within a 3-foot radius of the tree, and spread the fertilizer over the raked area. Rake the area again to mix the fertilizer into the top 1/2 inch of soil. Water the lemon cypress after fertilizing.

  • Water the lemon cypress when the top 2 inches of soil is dry.

?Inspect the lemon cypress tree periodically for signs of pests. Aphids and mealybugs are attracted to the lemon cypress. Control infestations with insecticidal soaps, according to the instructions on the label.

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  • The lemon cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa Goldcrest) is a cultivar of the striking Monterey cypress, native to the California coast.
  • Although it is sold outside of its hardiness zones as a houseplant, the lemon cypress generally won’t thrive in dry, indoor air.

Check the lemon cypress tree periodically for signs of coryneum canker fungus. Symptoms are similar to cold damage, with dieback of branches. Cut out diseased bark and destroy it. Removal of the tree may be necessary if the infection is widespread.

  • Inspect the lemon cypress tree periodically for signs of pests.
  • Check the lemon cypress tree periodically for signs of coryneum canker fungus.

Care Of A Lemon Cypress Tree

A lovely lemon cypress is easy to care for and emits a pleasant citrus-like scent in the slightest of breezes. It prefers full sun and a humid climate. The mature lemon cypress tree can handle drought conditions. If the tree is showing signs of slow growth, add a few inches of a mildly acidic compost to the top layers of soil. If the tree stands in water too long, it can damage the roots and kill the tree. Let the soil dry out on occasion to ensure that the tree isn’t getting overwatered, particularly during the rainy season. If you live in a dry climate, mist the tree every few weeks to keep the foliage its bright, cheery green. The size, easily maintained shape, color and pleasing scent make the lemon cypress tree a perfect choice for tiny indoor gardens. It is ideal as a choice for a bonsai tree because it can be clipped daily without harming the main tree. Each snip of garden sheers produces a burst of mood-boosting citrus scents. It is in the evergreen conifer family. A lemon cypress tree is also known as: * Lemon pine * Monterey cypress * Lemon cedar * Goldcrest lemon tree

  • A lovely lemon cypress is easy to care for and emits a pleasant citrus-like scent in the slightest of breezes.

Care Of A Lemon Cypress Tree

A lovely lemon cypress is easy to care for and emits a pleasant citrus-like scent in the slightest of breezes. It prefers full sun and a humid climate. The mature lemon cypress tree can handle drought conditions. If the tree is showing signs of slow growth, add a few inches of a mildly acidic compost to the top layers of soil. If the tree stands in water too long, it can damage the roots and kill the tree. Let the soil dry out on occasion to ensure that the tree isn’t getting overwatered, particularly during the rainy season. If you live in a dry climate, mist the tree every few weeks to keep the foliage its bright, cheery green. The size, easily maintained shape, color and pleasing scent make the lemon cypress tree a perfect choice for tiny indoor gardens. It is ideal as a choice for a bonsai tree because it can be clipped daily without harming the main tree. Each snip of garden sheers produces a burst of mood-boosting citrus scents. It is in the evergreen conifer family. A lemon cypress tree is also known as: * Lemon pine * Monterey cypress * Lemon cedar * Goldcrest lemon tree

  • A lovely lemon cypress is easy to care for and emits a pleasant citrus-like scent in the slightest of breezes.
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