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How to Kill Saw Grass in Your Yard

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grass image by Thomas Quinlan from Fotolia.com

Saw grass is a warm season grass known for tall, reed-like light green blades. Although saw grass is found primarily throughout the southeastern United States of Virginia, Georgia, South Carolina and Florida, saw grass may grow wherever sandy soil conditions and warm climates exist. Eliminating saw grass in your home lawn or garden is a very basic process that can be accomplished by anyone willing to devote time and effort to the task. Killing saw grass in your yard requires but a few short weeks and some inexpensive materials.

Mow down saw grass that is higher than 3 feet. While it is not necessary to mow your saw grass first, it might save you time if your lawn has excessive patches of saw grass.

Hand pull remaining patches of saw grass and dispose of it into a plastic trash bag or compost bin.

  • Saw grass is a warm season grass known for tall, reed-like light green blades.
  • Eliminating saw grass in your home lawn or garden is a very basic process that can be accomplished by anyone willing to devote time and effort to the task.

Spread sheets of old newspaper over remaining patches of saw grass in your yard. This will help block sunlight and other nutrients that remaining saw grass buds need in order to survive.

Weigh down the newspaper with bricks or other heavy objects and leave in place for a period of two weeks.

Remove the newspaper and weighted objects to reveal former saw grass patches. Inspect the patches to determine whether any new growth has developed. Hand pull any new growth and inspect the patches weekly to ensure saw grass has been completely eliminated from your yard.

Kill Bad Grass

Spray actively growing grass with a grass killer, such as the non-selective herbicide glyphosate. Apply it only when the weather is not windy and when rain is not expected for the next two days. Reapply the grass killer to live patches if necessary. Pick up the resulting clumps of grass, shake off the soil and discard the clumps. An option is to rake away the grass. Cover the unwanted grass with six layers of cardboard, then cover the cardboard with 4 to 6 inches of mulch, such as leaf mold. If desired, punch holes in the cardboard and plant mature plants in soil beneath the holes, but watch for grass that may sneak through the holes. Pull that grass to remove it. Mow the grass with a lawnmower set at its lowest cutting height and during the hottest time of the year. For other areas of the landscape, use a weed trimmer to cut the grass short. Water the cut grass with 1 inch of water. During that time, the grass underneath the tarp will die from the excess heat created by the tarp and weather.

  • Spray actively growing grass with a grass killer, such as the non-selective herbicide glyphosate.
  • If desired, punch holes in the cardboard and plant mature plants in soil beneath the holes, but watch for grass that may sneak through the holes.

Kill Bad Grass

Spray actively growing grass with a grass killer, such as the non-selective herbicide glyphosate. Apply it only when the weather is not windy and when rain is not expected for the next two days. Reapply the grass killer to live patches if necessary. Pick up the resulting clumps of grass, shake off the soil and discard the clumps. An option is to rake away the grass. Cover the unwanted grass with six layers of cardboard, then cover the cardboard with 4 to 6 inches of mulch, such as leaf mold. If desired, punch holes in the cardboard and plant mature plants in soil beneath the holes, but watch for grass that may sneak through the holes. Pull that grass to remove it. Mow the grass with a lawnmower set at its lowest cutting height and during the hottest time of the year. For other areas of the landscape, use a weed trimmer to cut the grass short. Water the cut grass with 1 inch of water. During that time, the grass underneath the tarp will die from the excess heat created by the tarp and weather.

  • Spray actively growing grass with a grass killer, such as the non-selective herbicide glyphosate.
  • If desired, punch holes in the cardboard and plant mature plants in soil beneath the holes, but watch for grass that may sneak through the holes.

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