How to Pot Amaryllis Bulbs With Two Stems

Overview

Many but not all amaryllis bulbs will produce more than one flower stalk per bulb each season. They can grow and mature almost concurrently or cascade into maturity and bloom with one stalk following the other. Planting and potting requirements are the same for both single and multiple stalk amaryllis and keeping the crown of the bulb well above the soil line remains key to healthy bloom and a healthy bulb.

Step 1

Select a pot for your double stalk amaryllis that is no more than one to two inches bigger in diameter than your cultivar of amaryllis bulb. Do not let the bulb touch the sides of the pot, but any pot significantly larger than the bulb increases the risk of rot. Ensure the pot has one or more good drainage holes that allow water to flow out freely.

Step 2

Fill the pot halfway with a good quality bagged planting medium . Set the bulb into the soil adding or subtracting soil under the bulb so that it sits with its shoulders or the top third of the bulb above the final soil line. Do not allow any soil to cover or fall between the two stalks. Water in well and keep lightly moist at all times.

Step 3

Cut down each stalk after the flower dies and the stalk starts to pale and become limp. Place the cut the bottom of the stem an inch above the tip of the bulb and discard the stalk. Repeat the process as each of the bloom stalks have finished flowering.

Things You'll Need

  • Pot one-inch larger in diameter than the bulb.
  • Gravel
  • Sterile potting mix
  • Water
  • Amaryllis bulb

References

  • University of Georgia: Amaryllis
  • North Dakota University Extension: Growing the Delightful Amaryllis
Keywords: amaryllis flower bulb, planting depth, two dual stalk stem

About this Author

An omni-curious communications professional, Dena Kane has more than 17 years of experience writing and editing content for online publications, corporate communications, business clients, industry journals, as well as film and broadcast media. Kane studied political science at the University of California, San Diego.