Facts About Flowering Plants

Facts About Flowering Plants image by Shendon: Morguefile, Paula Flat: Morguefile, Missyredboots: Morguefile
Facts About Flowering Plants image by Shendon: Morguefile, Paula Flat: Morguefile, Missyredboots: Morguefile

Overview

Ninety percent of the plant kingdom comprises flowering plants (termed angiosperms) of which many tropical species are yet unnamed. Flowering plants come in a variety of shapes and sizes and have been adapted to nearly every habitat on the earth. They have been the focus of botanical studies for years.

Flowers come in myriad shapes, sizes and colors.

History

It has been suggested that flowering plants first appeared upon the earth about 130 million years ago. Research is still being conducted today to determine the actual emergence of the first flowers.

Types

Flowering plants are classified into three basic groups: annuals, biennials and perennials.

Parts

A flowering plant consists of four major parts: flowers, leaves, stems and roots. Each part has a specific function.

Botanical Fact

One flowering plant could have two or three names---the scientific name (given by the botanist that discovered it) and two or three common or vernacular names.

Reproduction Fact

Flowering plants must be pollinated in order to produce seeds. Pollination can take place within the same plant (self-pollination) or may be accomplished with two different plants (cross-pollination).

Strawberry plants flower and bear fruit.

Ecological Benefits

Flowering plants contribute greatly to the world's supply of oxygen. They also convert light energy into chemical energy and make an excellent food source for animals as well as humans.

References

  • Wayne's Word: Diversity of Flowering Plants
  • eScience News: Secrets in a Seed---Clues Into the Evolution of the First Flower
  • National Geographic: The Big Boom---How Flowering Plants Changed the World
Keywords: Flowering plants, About flowering plants, Parts of flowering plants

About this Author

Loraine Degraff has been a writer and educator since 1999. She recently began focusing on topics pertaining to health and environmental issues. She is published in "Healthy Life Place" and "Humdinger" and also writes for various websites. Degraff holds a master's degree in communications design from Pratt Institute.

Photo by: Shendon: Morguefile, Paula Flat: Morguefile, Missyredboots: Morguefile