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How to Dry Amaryllis

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How to Dry Amaryllis

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Overview

Amaryllis flowers are best known for the bright, colorful petals that often form the shape of a six-pointed star. Another identifying characteristic is the tendency for five to six flowers to bloom on each stem. Due to this characteristic, amaryllis flowers are often dried in their complete form, still attached to the stem, for direction. Flowers are often dried by covering them with silica gel, but this is difficult to do with a stem with multiple blooms. For this reason, a more natural drying technique is recommended.

Step 1

Cut the amaryllis at the base of the stem once the flowers are in full bloom. Use a sharp razor blade for this as scissors may flatten or deform the shape of the stem.

Step 2

Hold the stem upside down so the flowers are at the bottom. Wrap a rubber band around the stem, right below the cut edge. Make sure the rubber band is secure and does not easily move.

Step 3

Feed a 1-foot-long piece of twine between the rubber band and the flower stem. Tie a small knot to secure the twine to the rubber band. Tie the other end of the twine to a clothes hanger.

Step 4

Hang the clothes hanger in a dark, dry area, such as a closet. Make sure the flowers get plenty of space to ensure they do not get smashed.

Step 5

Remove the flowers from the drying area once they feel completely dry to the touch, usually about three weeks. Spray the flowers with a thin layer of hairspray to reduce the risk of the petals breaking.

Things You'll Need

  • Razor blade
  • Rubber band
  • Twine
  • Clothes hanger
  • Hairspray

References

  • Pro Flowers: How to Dry Flowers
  • Amaryllis Garden: About Amaryllis
Keywords: dry amaryllis flowers, air dry amaryllis, dry flowers naturally

About this Author

Kenneth Coppens is a part-time freelance writer and has been for one year. He currently writes for Demand Studios, eHow, Associated Content and is the Indianapolis Craft Beer Expert for Examiner.