How to Transplant a TI Plant

Overview

The ti plant, also known as the Hawaiian good luck plant, is a leafy tropical with foliage that ranges from bright green to deep reds and purples, depending on the species. Outdoors it grows to heights of 4 to 6 feet, with a leaf spread of 3 to 5 feet. The ti, scientific name is Cordyline, is a member of the agave family, according to University of Hawaii Cooperative Extension. The ti plant is a true tropical and will grow outside only in U.S. Department of Agriculture planting zones 10b to 11, according to the University of Florida.

Step 1

Water the soil around the ti plant you are going to move two days before the transplant. The soil should be damp to a depth of at least 5 inches.

Step 2

Dig a hole twice as large as the root ball of your ti. The root ball on a mature ti will have a 24-inch diameter.

Step 3

Cut the soil around the base of your ti at least 12 inches from the base of the trunk of mature plants, less for smaller plants.

Step 4

Lift the root ball from the soil, for larger plants, employ a few extra shovels and hands to help you lift the root ball.

Step 5

Place the root ball into the prepared hole so that the base of the stem is level with the surrounding soil. Fill in the earth around the root ball a few shovels at a time, patting the soil down as you go.

Step 6

Water the area until the soil is damp to a depth of at least 12 inches. Keep the soil moist, but not saturated, for the first three weeks after transplanting.

Things You'll Need

  • Shovel
  • Water

References

  • University of Florida Extension: Cordyline terminalis Ti Plant
  • University of Florida Mid-Florida Education and Research Center: Cordyline - Ti Plant
  • University of Hawaii: Ti Plants for Hawai'i Landscapes
Keywords: caring for tropicals, plant care, moving plants

About this Author

Olivia Parker has been a freelance writer with Demand Studios for the past year, writing for Garden Guides and eHow. She has studied herbal and alternative medicine and worked as a landscape artist and gardener. Parker is currently pursuing a Bachelors of Arts from Boston University Online.