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How to Grow a TI Plant From a Cutting

By Larry Parr ; Updated September 21, 2017

The TI plant is grown all over the Hawaiian Islands for both its beauty and, in some cases, for the belief that the plant wards off evil. TI is generally grown for its beautiful, colorful leaves rather than for its blossoms, which are often discarded to prevent them from distracting from the long, beautiful leaves. TI plants can be propagated from seeds, but most gardeners prefer to start new TI plants from cuttings.

Cut your TI stems into approximately 2-inch lengths. If you have purchased precut TI stems, carefully scrape the wax off of each end, using your fingernail.

Put room-temperature water into a shallow dish and lay your TI cuttings lengthwise in the dish. The water should not cover the TI cuttings more than about halfway. Do not use cold water.

Place the dish with your TI cuttings in a warm location (70 to 75 degrees F) where they can receive plenty of indirect sunlight. Six to eight hours of indirect sunlight each day is perfect.

Replace the water every couple of days until you see roots beginning to form from the ends of your TI cuttings.

Fill a well-drained growing pot with cactus soil and bury your TI cutting lengthwise, with the soil just barely covering the cutting. Be careful not to break the roots as you transplant your cuttings. Water gently, keeping the soil damp but not overly saturated.

Keep your young TI plant out of direct sun for the first 60 days, but allow it to get plenty of indirect sun each day (at least six hours) and keep it in a warm place–70 to 75 degrees F is ideal. Do not allow your TI plant to experience temperatures of 40 degrees F or lower.

 

Things You Will Need

  • Stem of TI plant
  • Shallow dish
  • Water
  • Growing pot
  • Cactus planting mix

Tips

  • TI plants do not handle drought conditions well, so do not allow the soil to dry out completely.
  • After 60 days your TI plants can be planted outdoors so long as your winter temperatures are not below 40 degrees F.
  • TI plants are good container plants and can be grown indoors all year long.

About the Author

 

Larry Parr has been a full-time professional freelance writer for more than 30 years. For 25 years he wrote cartoons for television, everything from "Smurfs" to "Spider-Man." Today Parr train dogs and write articles on a variety of topics for websites worldwide.