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How to Plant a Mango Seed

By Stan DeFreitas ; Updated September 21, 2017

A mango seed, which is one of the largest in the plant kingdom, can be planted directly into the soil after drying out for a couple of days. Lay a mango seed flat into the ground with gardening help from an urban horticulturist in this free video on plant seeds.

Transcript

Hi, I'm Stan DeFreitas, Mr. Green Thumb, for askmrgreenthumb.com. Growing mangoes; you can raise them from seed. Now, the mango is a big beautiful fruit and that big fleshy fruit has one of the biggest seeds in the plant kingdom. When you take off all the outer part of the fruit, you're going to notice that long flat seed inside. Take that seed and kind of break it loose. Make sure you let it dry for a day or two and then you're going to put it right into a good soil and normally I just lay it flat. A lot of people are worried with a mango seed which way is up.? If you lay it flat, it will rectify itself. It'll find where the sunlight's coming from and where the soil is. So, don't be too worried about what direction that you plant a mango seed. Probably more important make sure it's a good viable seed and make sure that you plant a bunch of them. They don't all germinate. Remember also with diversity, because most are going to be hybrids, you may not get exactly what the mother plant was. Because of the pollination and open-air pollination, it probably will be somewhat different than what you had before. Maybe better and maybe worse. You don't always hit a home run when you start raising things from seed, but it's fun to do and it's fun to teach children how to grow something from a seed that you get from the fruit. They probably start easier than most and you don't really have to worry about chilling them or any of the other things that you do with some of the northern fruit crops. Put them in a good soil, make sure they stay moist and wait about a month before you have much of a germination. For growing mangoes, I'm Stan DeFreitas, Mr. Green Thumb.

 

About the Author

Stan DeFreitas, also known as "Mr. Green Thumb," has worked as an urban horticulturist for the Pinellas County Extension Service and has taught horticulture at St. Petersburg College.