Learn which plants thrive in your Hardiness Zone with our new interactive map!

How to Prune Peach Trees

By Richard Skinner ; Updated September 21, 2017

To prune peach trees, chop off the top once the tree hits 7 or 8 feet, trim back small branches in the late summer, and get rid of dead branches. Allow the sun to reach all branches of a peach tree through careful pruning with instructions from the owner of a plant nursery in this free video on growing peaches.

Transcript

How do you prune a peach tree? This is Richard Skinner in Hawkins Corner Nursery in Plant City, Florida. All across the country you can see peach orchards and the peach trees are not extremely tall. They are very wide but they are not extremely tall and you say well my peach tree is 12, 14, 16, 18, feet tall, why? Well that's because it didn't get pruned properly. When a peach tree gets between 7 and 8 foot tall in the center main branch you want to top it. In other words you want to cut it off and make it spread, why? Because you want sunlight to penetrate all of the limbs of the peach tree as the peaches are forming. This will give you size and quality. Pruning is very very easy. The first and main thing is what I just covered. Pruning to make it spread. The other thing is that you want to in the late Summer or early Fall prune back some of the little small limbs that are coming off of your main liter branches so that they don't wind up going a lot of peaches forming on those small branches which the tree will have problems holding. Of course the obvious also is if you have got any dead limbs you want to snip those off real soon so that they don't interfere with growing new growth. Pruning a peach tree is really real easy. You just sort of shape it and do it the way you want it to be done. This is Richard Skinner at Hawkins Corner Nursery in Plant, City Florida, how to prune your peach tree.

 

About the Author

 

Richard Skinner has been the owner and operator of Hawkins Corner Nursery in Plant City, Fla for the past three-plus decades. Skinner has a true love and passion for agriculture and horticulture. He has extensive knowledge regarding ornamental and fruit bearing trees, and he also owns and maintains a citrus grove, which has been in his family for more than 100 years.