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How to Trim Daylilies

By Martha Cycz ; Updated September 21, 2017

Learn how to trim daylilies in this free gardening video.

Transcript

So the very end of this season when your garden has basically ended it's flowering time. What is the best thing to do with these? Some people leave them alone they just let them stay like that and eventually they all would turn brown, the stems would turn brown and everything would turn brown and then it would fall to the ground in the winter time. In the spring time you rake it up, clean it up, you can leave it along or if you prefer you can just clip it back with your clippers. Now this has not totally die off now what I would do is I would take my pruning clippers and clip it back and clip each front and back. There is always more brown then this, sometimes you might find a violet growing they grow everywhere and then clip them back and leave them like that for the season. I use to just leave them alone but I have found that often times if you have this many plants and you leave them alone and they all die back into the ground is in this section between all of these plants is a great spot for bugs. They love to just kind of nestle in there for the winter or for the early parts of the winter or come in the spring time wherever they go in the winter I don't know and they love to just kind of lay there eggs in here. So I find taking aways as much debris everything from the old leaves, even to maybe some of the sawdust, if you have any mulch or some weeds, if you take away all of that and keep them clean then you may not have as many bugs in your garden and that is one thing we don't want to have depending on the weather. We want to keep them nice and neat so they would stay like that for the winter and in the spring they simple would start shotting up new leaves and before you know it they would start turning green and they would be ready for another season.

 

About the Author

 

Martha Cycz has been a perennial backyard gardener for more than 20 years. She began growing vegetables and flowers for early 4-H projects on an apple farm in Easthampton, Massachusetts. After having 3 children, she realized she needed to do something for herself. She found getting back to growing and designing gardens in her yard was just what she needed. Twenty years later she is still growing, experimenting with new plants and designs and loving every minute of it.