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How to Divide a Hydrangea

By Jessica Craven ; Updated September 21, 2017

When dividing a hydrangea, one of the most important things that you're going to need to remember is to use the right sized pot. Divide a hydrangea with help from a master gardener with certification in permacultural design in this free video clip.

Transcript

Hello. My name is Jessica Craven. I'm a master gardener with my certification in permacultural design. What we're going to talk about is how to divide a hydrangea. So say for example you have a hydrangea you really love like this one here. But it's starting to maybe get a little too big for the pot. And you realize or dear, it might be starting to get root bound. What I can do is I can bring my hydrangea out of the pot and I can want to then definitely either separate it in half and you want to start doing this from the bottom of the hydrangea. And you want to just gradually start to pull those small roots apart. And then with the larger roots you want to have something very sharp like a knife to definitely make a clean cut. And then what you want to do is make certain that you have two pots readily available. You want to immediately make certain that those hydrangea roots are in water because you don't want them to start to die. And go ahead and make certain that you have some good rocks at the bottom of each of the pots for drainage, have some great soil, any type of potted soil that you can purchase, or you can have regular soil mixed with compost to amend it. Put both of that into the pot and then start to add your plant. Make sure the smaller roots are on the bottom, that you have enough grow area for your hydrangea and then definitely add more soil along. You want to make certain that you keep your hydrangea very moist in this process so it doesn't go into shock. The best time to divide a hydrangea is after the blooming season is complete. So that would be fall or winter when the plant is starting to die back anyhow. You don't want to do this during the heavy bloom or grow season. Because what you'll do is you'll cause it to stop blooming, because it will need to focus its energy on that root growth. So I hope I've given you some tips on how to best divide your hydrangea.

 

About the Author

Jessica Craven has extensive experience working with school gardens, horticultural therapy gardens (for physically and developmentally disabled adults), as well as serving as a garden teacher.