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Hardy Perennial Herb Plants for Zone 7

By Jane Meggitt
Sage grows well in USDA Zone 7.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture's Hardiness Zone map, zone 7 stretches from New York City and its southern suburbs in a belt ending in New Mexico. Portions of Virginia, most of Tennessee, northern parts of Alabama and Mississippi, southern Missouri, Oklahoma and northern Texas lie in this zone, along with small areas of California and the Pacific Northwest. To overwinter, any zone 7 plants must be able to withstand winter low temperatures between zero and 10 degrees Fahrenheit.

Catmint

Felines love this tough, perennial herb, Nepeta Musinii. Don't confuse this member of the mint family with catnip. Hardy in zones 4 to 8, catmint matures between 1 1/2 and 3 feet high. Give this aggressive plant plenty of room in the garden. Easy to grow with little care needed, this North American native herb does well with average sun and soil, although the latter should be well-drained. Its strong-smelling leaves can be made into a tea. Don't plant it in the garden if you don't like cats. They like to catch cat naps in its environs.

Berggarten Sage

Hardy from zones 5 to 8, Salvia officinalis "Berggarten" brightens both the garden and many recipes. Disease-resistant, this German native sage plant grows up to 2 feet high. Plants need full sun, and good drainage is especially important, as "wet feet" can kill sage. Combine with other common culinary herbs for a classic kitchen garden. Each summer, sage produces blue blossoms.

Rosemary

Rosmarinus officinalis, hardy in zone 7, is another plant that smells and tastes as good as it looks. Rosemary was once as common a Christmas plant as holly and mistletoe. Rosemary does well in most soils, and can tolerate dry conditions. It thrives in full sun.

Silver Thyme

Hardy through zones 4 to 9, Thymus vulgaris "Argenteus," or silver thyme, prefers full sun and sandy soil. Its pink blossom appear each summer, and its leaves may be used to spice up various dishes or as a tea. Grow silver thyme in cracks and crevices in the garden or along pathways. Silver thyme matures at 1 foot tall.

 

About the Author

 

Jane Meggitt has been a writer for more than 20 years. In addition to reporting for a major newspaper chain, she has been published in "Horse News," "Suburban Classic," "Hoof Beats," "Equine Journal" and other publications. She has a Bachelor of Arts in English from New York University and an Associate of Arts from the American Academy of Dramatics Arts, New York City.