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How to Set Marble Chips for Yard Landscaping

By Jonah Morrissey ; Updated September 21, 2017
Marble chips combine brilliant white with subtle gray tones.

Marble chips lend a crisp, refined look to landscape pathways, borders and patios. Most landscape marble is bright white with a glittery, reflective appearance, although gray chips are occasionally available. Long-lasting, marble chip landscape features depend on proper preparation of the base and barriers that keep marble chips in place.

Step 1

Outline the area where you would like to install the marble chips by spraying with landscaping spray paint to create the borders.

Step 2

Dig out the soil inside the outline to a depth of 6 inches using a shovel. Keep the sides firm and straight up and down. Fill in the area with a 2 1/2-inch layer of crushed stone for the base. Dampen the crushed stone with water by spraying the area lightly with a hose. This helps in keeping the dust settled and compaction of the stones.

Step 3

Pack down the crushed stone with a hand tamper until it compresses into a 2-inch layer. Strike the surface of the stone pack evenly with the tamper to compact it.

Step 4

Roll landscaping fabric over the crushed stone pack. Trim the fabric to fit inside the space, using a utility knife. The fabric helps block weeds from growing up into the marble and keeps the stone pack in place.

Step 5

Insert your chosen edging around the edges of the area. Hammer the edging into the ground with a mallet until the top edge is flush with ground level. If using plastic edging, drive stakes at a slight downward angle through the edging near the bottom every 24 to 48 inches using a mallet.

Step 6

Fill in the remaining depth of the area with marble chips. Leave approximately 1/2 inch between the top of your edging and the marble chips. Rake and even out the marble chip surface using a bow rake.

 

Things You Will Need

  • Landscaping spray paint
  • Shovel
  • Crushed stone, also known as stone pack
  • Hand tamper
  • Landscaping fabric
  • Utility knife
  • Edging, with stakes
  • Mallet
  • Marble chips
  • Bow rake

About the Author

 

Jonah Morrissey has been writing for print and online publications since 2000. He began his career as a staff reporter/photographer for a weekly newspaper in upstate New York. Morrissey specializes in topics related to home-and-garden projects, green living and small business. He graduated from Saint Michael's College, earning a B.A. in political science with a minor in journalism and mass communications.