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How to Redo a Gravel Driveway

By Steve Smith ; Updated September 21, 2017

A gravel driveway is one way to pave a longer, rural-based driveway at a vacation home or cottage. It's also used on farmland, ranches and other industrial sites. Though it will not warp or crack like asphalt, the gravel drive is prone to washouts. Channels form in the driveway as water drains away after rain storms, and lumps or potholes form when parts of the drive compact and other parts erode away. In extreme cases, the best way to repair this type of damage is to redo the entire gravel drive.

Remove all loose debris from the gravel drive including branches, large rocks bigger than a baseball, and any other obstructions, including lawn tools, rakes and miscellaneous parts.

Move your tractor and box grader to the end of the driveway, parking the tractor so it is facing down the length of the driveway with the box grader over the very end of the drive.

Lower the box grader so it makes contact with the gravel driveway by depressing the hydraulic switch to lower the unit.

Place the tractor in its lowest gear and drive it forward very slowly, allowing the box grader time to dig up and sift the gravel drive surface. Work one section of the driveway at a time, going up and down the drive as needed. Run over difficult sections twice if necessary to properly smooth out the drive. The box grader will turn the soil and gravel up, sifting it and replacing it to create an entirely new surface.

Complete the final pass on the driveway and park the tractor away from the drive. Rake out any remaining seams or lumps in the driveway with a metal gravel rake to create a perfectly smooth surface.

 

Things You Will Need

  • Tractor
  • Box grader
  • Gravel rake

Tip

  • Adding gravel to most drives is not necessary, unless your driveway has sustained a lot of rain and water has washed most of it away. Only add gravel as necessary; the main point is to create a new, flat surface with the existing gravel and dirt.

About the Author

 

Steve Smith has published articles on a wide range of topics including cars, travel, lifestyle, business, golf, weddings and careers. His articles, features and news stories have appeared in newspapers, consumer magazines and on various websites. Smith holds a Bachelor of Arts in English and journalism from University of New Hampshire Durham.