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How to Repair Log Splitters

By Kelly Nuttall ; Updated September 21, 2017
Log splitter repair made accessible

Imagine looking two cords of wood in the eye and wondering how you are going to chop it all before snow starts to fly. Hydraulic log splitters use a wedge attached to a hydraulic piston to chop each log quickly and relatively easily. Log splitters can be towed to the area where you are felling trees to chop the wood on site, which will save time and effort once you get the wood home. Repairs may be required while you are on site, so you should be prepared.

Step 1

Loosen the nut on the bolt that fastens the wedge to the hydraulic cylinder with a wrench to remove the wedge so it can be sharpened. While the log splitter is in the horizontal position, loosen the hydraulic hose clamp to disconnect the hose from the valve. Lift the cylinder, slide the wedge forward, and lift the wedge off the log splitter. Use a bench grinder to sharpen the wedge and then reassemble the wedge, cylinder and hydraulic hose.

Step 2

Remove the breather cap from the fuel tank. Flush the cap with either kerosene or warm soapy water to remove the dirt and grime buildup. Allow the breather cap to dry thoroughly before reapplying it onto the fuel tank to avoid introducing water to the fuel system.

Step 3

Remove the hydraulic oil filter with an oil filter wrench. Place an oil catch pan directly underneath the oil filter to collect any wasted oil. Replace the old filter with a new filter. The oil filter should be replaced after the first 25 hours of use and every 100 hours after that. If the log splitter is used less than 100 hours in a season, the oil filter should be replaced seasonally. Check the hydraulic oil level and top it off if needed.

 

Things You Will Need

  • Wrench
  • Bench grinder
  • Kerosene
  • Warm soapy water
  • New oil filter
  • Oil catch pan
  • Hydraulic oil

About the Author

 

Kelly Nuttall is a student at Utah Valley University in Orem, Utah. She is set to graduate in the spring of 2011 with her bachelor's degree in technical communications. She has been writing for various websites since March of 2009.