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How to Bore Under a Drive

By Keith Allen ; Updated September 21, 2017

Occasionally, renovation projects require placing irrigation pipes or electrical wires under a driveway. Digging a trench through the driveway is difficult and expensive. Horizontal boring under the driveway is an option. While a garden hose and a steel pipe can be used as a do-it-yourself horizontal borer for a sidewalk or other narrow surface specialized equipment is necessary for the wider driveway. Rent the equipment and follow the included manufacturer's instructions.

Excavate the trench leading up to the side of the sidewalk. Create a pit about 1 foot deeper than the concrete or pavement surface of the driveway and about 6 feet long on the side of the driveway you will work from. Dig a similar pit on the opposite side of the driveway where the borer will exit.

Mount control brackets in the first pit. This keeps the horizontal borer straight as it is advanced under the driveway. Connect the flexible shaft to the boring machine and to one of the boring rods.

Advance the boring machine until the boring rod is completely under the driveway. Disconnect the rod from the flexible shaft and back up the boring machine. Add another boring rod to the first road and reconnect the flexible shaft. Advance the boring machine until these rods are under the driveway.

Repeat the process until the first rod is visible in the pit on the opposite side of the driveway. Connect the conduit or water line to the first boring rod. Use the boring machine to pull the rods back through the tunnel under the driveway.

 

Things You Will Need

  • Horizontal boring machine, rental
  • Shovel
  • Wheelbarrow

About the Author

 

Keith Allen, a 1979 graduate of Valley City State College, has worked at a variety of jobs including computer operator, medical clinic manager, radio talk show host and potato sorter. For over five years he has worked as a newspaper reporter and historic researcher. His works have appeared in regional newspapers in North Dakota and in "North Dakota Horizons" and "Cowboys and Indians" magazines.