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How to Separate Bromeliad Pups

By Mary Francis

Bromeliads are colorful blooming plants with long lasting, showy flowers. After flowering, the mother plant goes into a slow decline, during which those unfamiliar with it's method of reproduction will think it is dying and dispose of it, but don't toss that plant yet! During this decline, she puts out several pups around her base. These pups can easily be removed and potted to produce more blooms next year.

Step 1

Care for the plant as usual during the period after blooming to keep it healthy so it can produce pups. Allow the pups to grow to at least one-third, preferably half, of the height of the mother plant. Pups may put out their own roots, but it's not important that they do, as they root easily.

Step 2

Hold the pup securely, and use a serrated knife or small saw to cut the pup away as close to the mother plant as possible. Lay the pup aside to cure the stem for 24 hours.

Step 3

Mix potting soil and perlite in a 50-50 ratio. Fill a clay or plastic pot with the mix to within 1 inch of the top.

Step 4

Dip only the very bottom of the stem of the pup in rooting hormone, and stick into the pot. Anchor for stability if necessary. Water well and add water to the vase-like center of the plant.

 

Things You Will Need

  • Light potting mix with peat moss
  • Perlite
  • Clay or plastic pot
  • Serrated knife or small saw
  • Rooting hormone
  • Gloves (optional)

About the Author

 

Mary Francis is a horticulturist and expert garden writer with more than 15 years experience in the field. With degrees in both horticulture and business management, she has owned her own greenhouse business, an office organization business and now works full-time as a professional writer.