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How to Adjust a Rainbird 42Sa

By Patrick Nelson ; Updated September 21, 2017
Sprinkler adjustment helps in effective plant growth.

Rain Bird 42SA sprinkler system rotors can be adjusted to distribute the irrigation water exactly where you want it. This helps in water conservation, avoiding puddling on pathways and other areas, and in effective plant growth. The Rain Bird 42SA is designed for creeping grass, sandy soil and other scrub-like environments. Adjustments to it can include the start point of the spray arc; the arc itself; and the throw. These adjustments can be performed by following some fairly simple steps.

Adjust the left edge. The left edge is the starting point of the arc. It’s the line created by the Rain Bird 42SA sprinkler before rotation starts. Use the left edge to define paths, as it can be very precise. Create the left edge by moving the center cap all the way to the right until it can’t move any further. Then twist it to the left until it stops. Then rotate the whole case until the left edge is where you want it to be.

Adjust the arc using the arc adjustment screw. The arc adjustment screw is the screw farthest from the jet. Allow the sprinkler to start to rotate; it will turn and stop at 180 degrees from the left edge if no adjustments have been made to the arc since the sprinkler left the factory. This can be changed to anywhere between 40 and 360 degrees. Turn the screw in the direction of travel. Make adjustments until the rotor stops where you need it to.

Adjust the throw (radius) using the radius screw; it’s the screw closest to the jet. The throw distance is the maximum distance that the water reaches from the rotor. Water is shot into the air by the rotor. The higher the water is shot, the father the throw. It's set at maximum from the factory. Turning the screw reduces the throw by up to a quarter.

 

Things You Will Need

  • Flat-head screwdriver

About the Author

 

Patrick Nelson has been a professional writer since 1992. He was editor and publisher of the music industry trade publication "Producer Report" and has written for a number of technology blogs. Nelson studied design at Hornsey Art School.