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What Is the Difference Between a Red Maple & a Celebration Maple Tree?

By Megan Torrini ; Updated September 21, 2017
Maple leaves in autumn

The Red Maple (Acer rubrum) and the Celebration Red Maple (Acer x freemanii Celebration®) are broadleaf deciduous trees that belong to the Aceraceae family. The Celebration Red Maple is a hybrid of Red Maple and Silver Maple (Acer saccarinum).

Native Range

Maples can be found throughout the eastern and central United States.

The Red Maple has a native range of Eastern and Central North America. Because it is a hybrid, the Celebration Red Maple does not have a native range.

Growth Rate

A lone maple

The Red Maple grows at a fairly rapid rate. According to Plantfacts at Ohio State University, the Celebration Red Maple has the ability to grow up to four times as fast as the Red Maple.

Foliage

Samara on a maple

Blooming between March and April, the Red Maple is characterized by its fruit, called a samara, and its deep red and sometimes yellow autumn colors. Fruit is sparse on the Celebration Red Maple, and its autumn colors vary from yellow to red, resembling the Silver Maple in appearance.

Soil Culture

A maple in winter

The Red Maple commonly grows under extreme soil moisture conditions--either very wet or very dry--but can adapt to most soil conditions. Research performed by Plantfacts shows that the Celebration Red Maple prefers rich, well-drained soils but will tolerate dry or wet-neutral sites.

Topography

A tree-lined street

The Red Maple has the ability to grow on diverse sites such as upper slopes, intermediate elevations and swampy areas. The Celebration Red Maple is very urban tolerant and is often used to line sidewalks and streets.

 

References

About the Author

 

Based in Minnesota, Megan Torrini has been writing professionally since 2005. Her articles about the environment have appeared on various websites, and her articles on parenting have been featured at MomTalk.com. Torrini has a Bachelor of Science in environmental studies and forest resources from the University of Minnesota.