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Fertilizer

The Best Fertilizer for Trees

The best fertilizer for both young and established trees is a nitrogen fertilizer, according to the University of Minnesota Extension. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and osmocote are beneficial fertilizers for younger trees.

The best fertilizer for both young and established trees is a nitrogen fertilizer, according to the University of Minnesota Extension. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and osmocote are beneficial fertilizers for younger trees.

How to Apply Ammonium Sulfate

Mix about 6 ½ lbs. of ammonium sulfate per 1,000 square feet of lawn with an equal amount of compost.

Sprinkle the mixture over the lawn. Rake over the lawn to work it into the soil under the turf.

Water the lawn well for 10 to 15 minutes following the application of ammonium sulfate to avoid burning the lawn.

What Is a Good Fertilizer for My Vegetable Garden?

The best fertilizer for your vegetable garden, according to the National Gardening Association, is a thick layer of compost or other organic material mixed into the soil. Most gardens don't need more than this to nourish their plants.

The Best Fertilizer for Flowers

Phosphorous encourages flower blossom growth. The best fertilizer for flowers should be formulated with equal amounts of nitrogen, phosphate and potassium (such as 10-10-10), or ratios with a lower level of nitrogen, according to the University of Connecticut.

The Best Fertilizer for a Philodendron

The best fertilizer for philodendron plants is a standard soluble houseplant fertilizer, according to Colorado State University's PlantTalk. Apply the fertilizer according to the specific product's guidelines, as nutritional potency varies by manufacturer.

What Is the Best Fertilizer for Gardens?

According to the National Gardening Association, compost is the best fertilizer for gardens. It is naturally made by combining and turning green and brown organic matter such as leaves, yard clippings and food scraps until it breaks down into a rich soil.