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Types of Pink Flowers

By Elizabeth Balarini ; Updated September 21, 2017
Pink morning glory

Pink is a feminine color that is also refreshing and clean. In the plant world, pink flowers represent happiness, youth, innocence and gentility. A gift of a pink flower conveys friendship or innocent romantic interest. There are countless species of pink flowers in nature. Whether given as a gift or growing in a home garden, pink flowers are a refreshing sight to behold.

Morning Glory

Morning glory is a vining flowering plant native to Central America or Mexico. The delicate flowers are only 2 to 3 inches in diameter. The plants grow vines in excess of 12 feet long and do well trained up trellises. As the name implies, the sun-loving blooms open up when the sun rises each morning and snap shut at sunset.

Maiden Pink Dianthus

Maiden pink dianthus produces flowers that are smaller than an inch in diameter. The flowers grow wild, along road sides and in parks. The flowers bloom May through July. The stems of maiden pinks are long and slender, and the petals have a fine ring of darker pink in the center of the cone where they meet.

Rose

Pink rose

Pink roses are perhaps the most widely-recognize pink flower. Pink roses are prized for their simple beauty as well as their fragrance. Pink roses grow on thorned bushes. The buds and flowers are popular gifts for Valentine's Day and Mother's Day.

Zinnia

Pink zinnia

Zinnias are native to the Southwest United States, Mexico and Central America. The plants originally grew wild, but because of their beauty they are now commercially grown. There are 20 different species of zinnias, ranging in single-rowed petals to domed, concentric circles of petals.

Chrysanthemum "Clara Curtis"

Clara Curtis chrysanthemum

The Clara Curtis chrysanthemum is a strong, cold-hardy chrysanthemum that looks like a daisy. The petals are powder pink, and the center is a mound of bright yellow. These plants survive cold, harsh winters with their root systems live and intact. The plants grow 18 inches tall, and they spread quickly. The Clara Curtis is grown as a focal-point plant or a colorful ground cover.

 

About the Author

 

Elizabeth Balarini is a freelance writer and professional blogger who began writing professionally in 2006. Her work has been published on several websites. Her articles focus on where her passions lie: writing, web development, blogging, home and garden, and health and wellness. Balarini majored in English at the University of Texas at San Antonio.