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Types of Viburnum Bushes

By Callie Barber ; Updated September 21, 2017
Viburnum berries

Viburnum bushes are unfussy, showy shrubs grown for their fall foliage, bright red berries and fragrant flowers. Viburnum shrubs are classified as an evergreen, semi-evergreen or deciduous plant. The flowers on the viburnum emerge every spring and range from red to pink, white and cream. This versatile shrub also tolerates many climates, and with over 150 different species to choose from, you can’t go wrong with this hardy bloomer.

Blackhaw Viburnum

Blackhaw viburnum is a deciduous shrub with a slow-to-moderate growth rate. It grows up to 15 feet tall and 12 feet wide, making for a striking bush in the landscape. The rounded, multistemmed branches have creamy white, delicate flowers that range from 2 to 4 inches long. The dark green leaves grow over 3 inches long and are oval in shape. Blackhaw viburnum prefers full sun to partial shade and grows in a wide range of soil types. This shrub is drought tolerant. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Plant Hardiness Zone is 3 to 9.

Chindo Viburnum

This rapid-growing evergreen prefers full sun to partial shade and grows in a wide range of soil types, excluding wet soils. Chindo viburnum grows up to 15 feet tall with a pyramidal shape and dense, upright branches. The flowers on this evergreen are rounded, white and contrast with the waxy, green leaves. The leathery leaves range from 3 to 7 inches long.This shrub is drought tolerant. The plant is hardy in USDA zones 7b to 9.

Doublefile Viburnum

The doublefile viburnum is a deciduous bush that grows up to 10 feet tall and wide. Its spreading, tiered branches are rounded and billowing. The flowers on the doublefile are flat, lacelike and range from 2 to 4 inches long. They emerge every spring to light up the shrub with color. The dark green leaves are long and oval, ranging from 2 to 4 inches long. Beginning in the fall, the foliage changes to reddish purple. Doublefile viburnum prefers sun to partial shade and well-drained, moist soil. It is also drought tolerant and the fruit attracts birds. Hardy in USDA zones 5 to 7.

Koreanspice Viburnum

Koreanspice is a deciduous bush that grows up to 6 feet tall and wide. Its rounded, dense shape has upright branches and pink to red flower buds. The flowers are fragrant and 2 to 3 inches long. The leaves on the Koreanspice range from dark green to gray-green. Koreanspice prefers sun to partial shade and well-drained soil. It can tolerate clay soils, making it a hardy bush in USDA zones 4 to 7.

 

About the Author

 

Callie Barber has been writing professionally since 2002. Barber's love for design and writing inspired her to create Design Your Revolution, a blog that shares creative and affordable ways to decorate indoor and outdoor living environments. Her articles have appeared on Travels.com and GardenGuides.com. Barber holds a Bachelors of Arts in international studies from the University of North Carolina.