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How to Grow Republic of Texas Orange Trees

By Bridget Kelly ; Updated September 21, 2017

For a tree that doesn’t require a lot of attention, the Republic of Texas orange tree sure delivers some great tasting oranges. The Republic of Texas orange tree has been around a while, growing in the Santa Fe area of Texas since the mid-1800s. It is a thorny, cold-tolerant citrus tree that will bloom in the spring and produce medium-size oranges in December. The Republic of Texas orange tree will grow 15 feet in height and width and is hardy to USDA zones 8 through 11.

Plant the Republic of Texas orange tree where it will get at least six hours of sun per day and in a somewhat sheltered area out of the way of strong winds and gusts.

Water the Republic of Texas orange tree slowly but thoroughly every two weeks, keeping the soil around the tree moist to within 1 inch of the surface. Skip the watering for two weeks if it rains.

Fertilize the Republic of Texas orange tree with ammonium sulfate with 1 cup of ammonium sulfate per year of the age of the tree, according to Texas A&M University. Apply it in February, May and September (a 5-year-old Republic of Texas orange tree would need 5 cups of 21-0-0 fertilizer per year).

Check the orange tree for signs of pests and diseases. Take a leaf sample to your county cooperative extension agent for a diagnoses and possible treatment if leaves that are stunted or distorted are present.

Control the size of the tree by pruning it after the last freeze, while the tree is still dormant, but pruning the Republic of Texas orange tree is not necessary.

 

Things You Will Need

  • Ammonium sulfate

Tips

  • If it is particularly hot and dry, the Republic of Texas orange tree may need to be watered once or twice a week.
  • Citrus pests and diseases can vary according to the region of the country in which the tree is being grown. A county cooperative extension agent can help identify pests that are particular to your region.

About the Author

 

Based in the American Southwest, Bridget Kelly has been writing about gardening and real estate since 2005. Her articles have appeared at Trulia.com, SFGate.com, GardenGuides.com, RE/MAX.com, MarketLeader.com, RealEstate.com, USAToday.com and in "Chicago Agent" magazine, to name a few. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in English with a concentration in creative writing.