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How to Transplant Asparagus Plants

By Jenny Harrington ; Updated September 21, 2017

Asparagus is one of the few perennial vegetable plants available for home gardens. The plants continue to produce the edible shoots for up to 30 years. They can be planted in vegetable beds or interspersed in ornamental beds throughout the landscape. The spears grow from root crowns beneath the soil surface. Due to their long life, it may be necessary to transplant the asparagus plants if your landscape design changes. Doing so properly ensures the plants remain healthy and productive in their new bed.

Inspect the asparagus clumps to locate the site of the crown. The crown is beneath the area with the densest amount of old stems.

Dig around the clump with a blunt trowel, taking care not to hit the crown with the trowel. Dig down approximately 8 to 10 inches.

Slide the trowel under the asparagus crown, and lift the crown from the ground. Brush off the excess soil from the roots.

Prepare a well-draining bed in full sun for the transplants. Lay a 2-inch layer of compost over the bed, and till it in to a 12-inch depth. Apply 3 lb. of 5-10-10 analysis fertilizer per every 100 square feet of bed, prior to planting.

Dig a 1 foot long trench that is 12 inches deep. Set the asparagus crown in the trench, and spread out the roots evenly around the plant. Cover the crown with 2 inches of soil, and firm it lightly with your hands. Space the crowns 2 feet apart on all sides.

Water the bed thoroughly after planting. Continue to water during extended dry periods throughout spring, summer and fall.

 

Things You Will Need

  • Spade
  • Compost
  • Fertilizer

Tip

  • Transplant asparagus in winter before they begin growing again, but when the ground isn't frozen.

Warning

  • While many of the small, hair-like roots may be damaged when digging up the asparagus, avoid cutting the large, thick roots. Damage allows rot and disease to enter and possibly kill the plant.

About the Author

 

Jenny Harrington has been a freelance writer since 2006. Her published articles have appeared in various print and online publications. Previously, she owned her own business, selling handmade items online, wholesale and at crafts fairs. Harrington's specialties include small business information, crafting, decorating and gardening.