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How to Cut Back a Siberian Iris

Iris lovers who enjoy a variety of irises in their gardens are choosing Siberian Irises in increasing numbers. Siberian irises provide tall landscape plants with blooms in purple, blue, pink, yellow and white. Siberian irises adapt more readily to a variety of soil conditions than some other iris varieties and avoid some of the common iris problems. Cut back a Siberian iris carefully to ensure the continued health of the plant.

Deadhead the Siberian iris plant by removing the faded blossoms when they wilt on the plants. Use the pruning shears to remove the blossoms at the point where they connect with the stems. While deadheading is not mandatory, it will make the irises more attractive.

  • Iris lovers who enjoy a variety of irises in their gardens are choosing Siberian Irises in increasing numbers.
  • Deadhead the Siberian iris plant by removing the faded blossoms when they wilt on the plants.

Clip off all of the bloom stalks from just above the crowns of the plant when the plant finishes blossoming for the season. Leave the other foliage intact at this time.

Remove the remaining foliage from the Siberian iris in the autumn. When the foliage withers and browns, cut off all growth 1 inch above the soil level. Discard the foliage.

Siberian Iris Plant Tips

Siberian iris is hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 3 to 9. Fill the hole with garden soil and pat down so that the rhizome is parallel or just a tad below the soil level. Siberian iris requires a well-draining soil. Siberian iris, and other beardless irises, prefer more acidic soil than bearded varieties. Soil pH should fall between 5.5 and 6.5. To improve soil, apply 2 pounds of a 5-10-10 fertilizer per 100 square feet about two to three weeks before planting. The University of California Integrated Pest Management Program recommends dead heading and disposing spent flowers and avoiding high-nitrogen fertilizers and overuse of insecticides, which often kill beneficial predators.

  • Clip off all of the bloom stalks from just above the crowns of the plant when the plant finishes blossoming for the season.
  • Fill the hole with garden soil and pat down so that the rhizome is parallel or just a tad below the soil level.

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