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How to Grow & Care for Viola Pansies Indoors

By Jenny Harrington ; Updated September 21, 2017

Pansies, also known as viola tricolor, are a cool-weather-flowering perennial that is usually grown as an annual flower. They come in a large range of colors and many blossoms feature two to three colors on each bloom. While pansies can be purchased as bedding plants growing your own indoors then transplanting them outside saves money, especially if you are planting a large area. They can also be grown in containers and brought inside during summer heat or winter frosts so they can be grown as perennials.

Start seeds indoors in mid-winter for spring beds or mid-summer for fall pansy beds. Plant seeds six to eight weeks before you plan to transplant them outside.

Fill a seedling pot with a soil-less potting mixture. Water until it just begins to drip from the bottom drainage holes, ensuring the potting mix is evenly moist throughout.

Sow seeds on the surface of the potting mix then cover with 1/8 inch of mix. Cover with a layer of plastic wrap and place in a dark, 70- to 75-degree F room to germinate.

Remove the plastic once sprouts appear, approximately 10 to 20 days after sowing. Move seedlings to a brightly lit window and water as needed to maintain soil moisture.

Transplant seedlings to a permanent container when they have two sets of leaves each. Fill the container with the same potting mix and transplant seedlings into it, spacing them 6 inches apart.

Transplant seedlings to a permanent container when they have two sets of leaves each. Fill the container with the same potting mix and transplant seedlings into it, spacing them 6 inches apart.

Fertilize pansies every two to four weeks with a water soluble fertilizer. Follow label instructions for exact application amounts.

 

Things You Will Need

  • Pot
  • Potting mix
  • Plastic wrap
  • Planter
  • Fertilizer

Tip

  • During the winter, place the pansies under grow lights for 12 to 15 hours a day to ensure they have enough light.

Warning

  • Powdery mildew appears as white or gray spots on leaves. Too much water and not enough light are often the cause.

About the Author

 

Jenny Harrington has been a freelance writer since 2006. Her published articles have appeared in various print and online publications. Previously, she owned her own business, selling handmade items online, wholesale and at crafts fairs. Harrington's specialties include small business information, crafting, decorating and gardening.