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Full Sun Garden Plants in Florida

By T.M. Samuels ; Updated September 21, 2017

Florida incorporates the USDA hardiness zones of 8b to 10b, with very humid and tropical weather. Plants for 8b to 19b zones are those able to withstand this heat. Full sun plants for New York may not be the same as full sun plants for Florida as Florida’s temperatures and direct sun are much higher than New York’s. Choices for Florida full sun plants include many favorites.

Calliopsis

Coreopsis tinctoria, also known as calliopsis or golden coreopsis, is from the Asteraceae/Compositae family. It is a fast growing annual that attracts butterflies and hummingbirds to the garden. Leaves are 2 to 4 inches long. Stems are stiff and carry flowerheads 2 inches wide. Colors are red, orange, maroon, bronze, and yellow. Grow a calliopsis in full sun with any well drained soil. Propagate via seed.

Pansy

Viola x Wittrockiana, also known as a pansy or ladies-delight, is from the Violaceae family. It is a perennial grown as an annual. It will get 4 to 10 inches tall with deep green leaves. Flowers are 1 to 4 inches wide in any color you can imagine. Grow pansy in any soil in bright sun to partial shade. Propagate via cuttings and seeds.

Canna

Canna x generalis, also known as canna or canna lily, is from the Cannaceae family. It is an easy to grow fast growing perennial good for cut flower arrangements and containers. It gets 30 inches to 8 feet tall in many different colors. Flowers will give way to capsulated seeds. Grow canna in sun but it can tolerate some shade. Give it moist soil and propagate via rhizome division.

Rain Lily

Zephyranthes grandiflora, also known as rain lily or pink storm lily, is from the Amaryllidaceae family. It is a perennial. Flowers come after a rain on a 7 inch stalk. Rose pink blooms will be 3 inches long. Leaves are grass like and 10 to 12 inches long. Grow rain lily in well fertilized soil in full sun or partial shade. Propagate via offset division in spring.

 

About the Author

 

T.M. Samuels has been a freelance writer since 1993. She has published works in "Arthritis Today," "Alabama Living" and "Mature Years," and is the author of a gardening book. Samuels studied pre-medicine at Berry College.