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How Much Does Grass Grow in a Day?

The rate of grass growth depends on the type of grass, weather, amount of sun, water and other factors. Generally, grass grows at a rate of 2 to 6 inches a month, or an average of .06 to .20 inches a day.

Grass Won't Grow

You create a new lawn, or fill patchy areas in an established lawn, with sod, seed or grass sprigs -- choosing among these three turf choices depends on your overall location and budget. Specific environmental factors, however, influence grass establishment and seedling growth. With all the labor involved to plant and nourish your lawn, take immediate action if you see that your grass won't grow. Some simple environmental changes should do the trick. If your soil was not prepared properly prior to turf installation, your grass will certainly not grow, especially if it lacks nutrient-rich organic matter. For example, newly seeded areas only need the top 1/2- to 1-inch soil layer moistened to encourage germination. Waterlogging and drought conditions inhibit grass growth; a moisture meter pressed into the ground gives you an accurate reading of the soil's water needs, if you are unsure from observation. As you walk and play on your turf, the soil below slowly clumps together to create a suffocating root atmosphere. Spread a recommended fertilizer for your grass species on your bare soil and slightly till it into the top 3 to 4 inches.

  • You create a new lawn, or fill patchy areas in an established lawn, with sod, seed or grass sprigs -- choosing among these three turf choices depends on your overall location and budget.
  • Waterlogging and drought conditions inhibit grass growth; a moisture meter pressed into the ground gives you an accurate reading of the soil's water needs, if you are unsure from observation.

Grass Won't Grow

You create a new lawn, or fill patchy areas in an established lawn, with sod, seed or grass sprigs -- choosing among these three turf choices depends on your overall location and budget. Specific environmental factors, however, influence grass establishment and seedling growth. With all the labor involved to plant and nourish your lawn, take immediate action if you see that your grass won't grow. Some simple environmental changes should do the trick. If your soil was not prepared properly prior to turf installation, your grass will certainly not grow, especially if it lacks nutrient-rich organic matter. For example, newly seeded areas only need the top 1/2- to 1-inch soil layer moistened to encourage germination. Waterlogging and drought conditions inhibit grass growth; a moisture meter pressed into the ground gives you an accurate reading of the soil's water needs, if you are unsure from observation. As you walk and play on your turf, the soil below slowly clumps together to create a suffocating root atmosphere. Spread a recommended fertilizer for your grass species on your bare soil and slightly till it into the top 3 to 4 inches.

  • You create a new lawn, or fill patchy areas in an established lawn, with sod, seed or grass sprigs -- choosing among these three turf choices depends on your overall location and budget.
  • Waterlogging and drought conditions inhibit grass growth; a moisture meter pressed into the ground gives you an accurate reading of the soil's water needs, if you are unsure from observation.
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