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How to Plant Ground Cover With Tulips

By Dena E. Bolton ; Updated September 21, 2017

Tulips are among the most popular of all the spring-flowering bulbs. With over 100 species of tulips and hundreds of hybrids available, gardeners can have their landscapes filled with a rainbow of color each spring. However, bare patches of ground can be left after the tulips are spent. Ground cover can fill in these spots and also provide a carpet underneath your tulips.

Do not choose very dense, thick, woody (i.e., have woody stems as found on shrubs) ground cover. Your tulips will not be able to grow up through it. For example, steer clear of junipers, such as "Wiltonii," that are great for suppressing weeds but will also suppress the growth of spring-flowering bulbs such as tulips.

Choose low-growing ground covers such as "Creeping Jenny" and various sedums, such as "Angelina." Different types of thyme are also good choices. These types of ground covers do not have thick woody stems, making it easier for the tulips to grow up through them.

Plant directly over the tulips. There is no need to worry about planting ground cover directly on top of your tulips. The tulips will find their way to the surface. Simply dig about a 1-inch trough where you want you ground cover and place the ground cover in the trough. Cover with soil.

Space your ground cover about 12-18 inches apart. Most ground cover has a 12-18-inch spread; therefore, if you are planting more than one pot of ground cover, you should space the plants at least this far apart. As they grow, they will fill in the gaps.

 

Things You Will Need

  • Garden spade

Tip

  • You can also plant later-growing perennials around your tulips. These perennials, such as lilies and daisies, will grow and cover the ugly dead stems of your tulips.

Warning

  • All ground covers can get really thick over time. If you notice that your tulips are not growing as well, thin out the ground cover some to give the tulips a little more room to grow.

About the Author

 

Dena Bolton has written for local newspapers and magazines since 1980. She currently writes online for various sites, focusing on gardening. She has a BA in Political Science and German and graduate credits in Latin American Studies from East Tennessee State University. In addition, she is a TN Master Gardener.