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How to Start an Asian Pear Tree From Seed

By Heide Braley ; Updated September 21, 2017

Asian pears are fast becoming a standard fruit in grocery stores across the world. In some markets they have been popular for several years as the growth of the tree has spread to new areas. You can start a tree yourself from the seeds of an Asian pear that you maybe have eaten, saving the core and the seeds. It is not much different than starting an apple tree except that you will not need to stratify the seeds if you use them fresh from an Asian pear.

Remove the Asian pear seeds from the fruit. Save as many as possible since you never know how many of them will actually germinate successfully. Also realize, that unlike an apple or pear tree seedling, these Asian pear trees are not cold hardy and can only be grown in areas where the freezing will not kill them off.

Plant the seeds in small 8-ounce plant pots, two or three to each. Cover them with about an inch of soil and tap the soil down gently over the seeds.

Water the newly planted seeds and make sure the container you are using has drainage holes poked in the bottom so the soil doesn't stay soggy.

Cover the pot with a plastic bag so that it has its own little dome or miniature greenhouse effect. Keep it in place with a rubber band or string. This will keep the humidity levels and warmth levels a little higher than if you didn't cover it.

Check to see if the seed has sprouted after a few weeks. You should see little green leaves coming through the soil. Allow the plant to grow for a couple of months in the original container and then transplant it outside when the weather has warmed or into a larger pot if you are going to grow it indoors.

 

Things You Will Need

  • Potting soil
  • Plant pot
  • Label
  • Water
  • Plastic bag
  • Rubber band/string

About the Author

 

Maryland resident Heide Braley is a professional writer who contributes to a variety of websites. She has focused more than 10 years of research on botanical and garden articles and was awarded a membership to the Society of Professional Journalists. Braley has studied at Pennsylvania State University and Villanova University.