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How to Get Rid of Japanese Beetles With a Home Remedy Spray

Japanese beetles are one of the most prevalent insect pests in America. Adult beetles will devour just about any green plant, and the grubs, which live in the soil, are notorious for ruining otherwise lush expanses of turf. Japanese beetle traps are not effective, as they attract just as many beetles as they catch, and chemical means of controlling them are harmful to the earth. Instead, get rid of Japanese beetles by mixing up an organic home remedy spray.

Fill a pot with a gallon of water and bring it to a boil.

Drop one-half cup of chopped jalapeno peppers and one-half cup of dried cayenne peppers into the water. Reduce the heat, cover the pot and let the peppers simmer for a half hour.

Turn off the heat and let the water and peppers cool. Strain out the peppers and pour the water into a spray bottle.

Protect your hands with gloves. If the weather is windy, protect your eyes as well, as this home remedy spray will not only hurt the Japanese beetles, but will sting you if it drifts into your eyes.

Spray the plants thoroughly from top to bottom. This will get rid of the Japanese beetles, as they hate the taste of the spicy water on the leaves, but it will not harm your plant.

Rid Of Japanese Beetles

Imagine a world free of ravenous Japanese beetles who eat every plant in sight. The water surrounding the island and the insect's natural predators kept them contained there until the fateful day that some Japanese beetles were accidentally shipped to the United States along with a plant. If you want to return your garden to a beetle-free paradise, you can take steps to reclaim your land. If you prefer to avoid touching the beetles, cover your plants with a dropcloth in the morning when the pests are most active. After they've gathered on it, shake them off into a large bucket of soapy water. When planning your garden, choose plants wisely to prevent beetles. Instead, plant things the beetles dislike, such as holly trees (Ilex spp.) and magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora). Geraniums are toxic to Japanese beetles, but their delicious flavor often overpowers the beetle's self-preservation instinct. Though it's benign to people, soap kills insects. To harness soap's killing power, spray your plant leaves with a mixture that is 1 teaspoon of liquid dish soap, 1 cup of vegetable oil, 1 quart of water and 1 cup of rubbing alcohol. Shake the solution well and apply it to your plants every 10 days. The mixture may damage your plants if applied during hot weather or in direct sunlight. It also saves your lawn, which the grubs feed on as they grow. This recipe makes enough spray to cover 1,000 square feet. Apply this homemade solution to your lawn once in the fall and again in the spring. When applied to the soil, milky spore and nematodes prevent Japanese beetles by killing the grubs before they reach adulthood and mate. Nematodes are microscopic roundworms. These parasites burrow into grubs and infect them with bacteria. Fifty million will treat a 1/2-acre lawn and 100 million will treat one acre. You can also make your own trap with a can of fruit cocktail.

Rid Of Japanese Beetles

Imagine a world free of ravenous Japanese beetles who eat every plant in sight. The water surrounding the island and the insect's natural predators kept them contained there until the fateful day that some Japanese beetles were accidentally shipped to the United States along with a plant. If you want to return your garden to a beetle-free paradise, you can take steps to reclaim your land. If you prefer to avoid touching the beetles, cover your plants with a dropcloth in the morning when the pests are most active. After they've gathered on it, shake them off into a large bucket of soapy water. When planning your garden, choose plants wisely to prevent beetles. Instead, plant things the beetles dislike, such as holly trees (Ilex spp.) and magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora). Geraniums are toxic to Japanese beetles, but their delicious flavor often overpowers the beetle's self-preservation instinct. Though it's benign to people, soap kills insects. To harness soap's killing power, spray your plant leaves with a mixture that is 1 teaspoon of liquid dish soap, 1 cup of vegetable oil, 1 quart of water and 1 cup of rubbing alcohol. Shake the solution well and apply it to your plants every 10 days. The mixture may damage your plants if applied during hot weather or in direct sunlight. It also saves your lawn, which the grubs feed on as they grow. This recipe makes enough spray to cover 1,000 square feet. Apply this homemade solution to your lawn once in the fall and again in the spring. When applied to the soil, milky spore and nematodes prevent Japanese beetles by killing the grubs before they reach adulthood and mate. Nematodes are microscopic roundworms. These parasites burrow into grubs and infect them with bacteria. Fifty million will treat a 1/2-acre lawn and 100 million will treat one acre. You can also make your own trap with a can of fruit cocktail.

Tip

To treat large plants, mix several batches of the spray and place in a pressure sprayer for easier application.

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