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How to Mulch Blueberry Bushes

Gardeners growing blueberries are usually quite aware of the specific needs and requirements these fruitful shrubs have. A successful blueberry harvest depends on proper soil, adequate moisture, bountiful sunshine and protective mulch. Proper mulching of the blueberry shrubs will not only protect the root systems, but as it decomposes, it will improve the soil around the blueberry shrubs. Replenish mulch around the blueberry bushes often to ensure proper growing conditions.

Mulch first-year blueberry bushes with a sawdust that has had time to decay and rot. Suggested woods for sawdust include hemlock, pine and fir. Place a 3-inch depth of mulch around the base of the blueberry bushes and extend the mulch out approximately 2 feet from the center of the blueberry bushes.

  • Gardeners growing blueberries are usually quite aware of the specific needs and requirements these fruitful shrubs have.
  • Proper mulching of the blueberry shrubs will not only protect the root systems, but as it decomposes, it will improve the soil around the blueberry shrubs.

Add additional sawdust or switch to shredded leaves or pine needles after the first year. Increase the mulch amount from 3 to 6 inches during the second and subsequent years. Push the mulch into mounds around the crowns of the blueberry bushes and extend the mulch out to the outermost edges of the blueberry bushes.

Monitor the mulch throughout the growing season and ensure it stays at 6 inches. Ensure the mulch is at the proper level at the end of the growing season before winter weather begins.

Replenish the mulch each spring at the beginning of the growing seasons.

Blueberry Bushes & Dogs

Blueberry bushes need regular feeding with a 10-10-10 fertilizer that contains ammonium sulfate or a potassium sulfate. The U.S. National Library of Medicine indicates that while ammonium sulfate has a low toxicity, a dog who comes in contact with large amounts of this compound may exhibit apathy, breathing problems and problems with mobility. A fertilizer with potassium sulfate is a safer choice as it is often used in dog food. To ensure the greatest berry yield from your bushes, you might be tempted to use pesticides to control damage. Just like humans, dogs can have allergic reactions to certain foods, including blueberries. If your dog has access to blueberry bushes and starts to excessively lick or scratch, develops diarrhea or hot spots on the skin, begins to vomit or has skin or ear infections, it may be a sign of a blueberry allergy. Canine urination patterns may harm your blueberry bushes, so it is best to train your dog to use another spot to "do his business."

  • Blueberry bushes need regular feeding with a 10-10-10 fertilizer that contains ammonium sulfate or a potassium sulfate.
  • Canine urination patterns may harm your blueberry bushes, so it is best to train your dog to use another spot to "do his business."

Blueberry Bushes & Dogs

Blueberry bushes need regular feeding with a 10-10-10 fertilizer that contains ammonium sulfate or a potassium sulfate. The U.S. National Library of Medicine indicates that while ammonium sulfate has a low toxicity, a dog who comes in contact with large amounts of this compound may exhibit apathy, breathing problems and problems with mobility. A fertilizer with potassium sulfate is a safer choice as it is often used in dog food. To ensure the greatest berry yield from your bushes, you might be tempted to use pesticides to control damage. Just like humans, dogs can have allergic reactions to certain foods, including blueberries. If your dog has access to blueberry bushes and starts to excessively lick or scratch, develops diarrhea or hot spots on the skin, begins to vomit or has skin or ear infections, it may be a sign of a blueberry allergy. Canine urination patterns may harm your blueberry bushes, so it is best to train your dog to use another spot to "do his business."

  • Blueberry bushes need regular feeding with a 10-10-10 fertilizer that contains ammonium sulfate or a potassium sulfate.
  • Canine urination patterns may harm your blueberry bushes, so it is best to train your dog to use another spot to "do his business."

Warning

Never use grass clippings around blueberry bushes because this can increase the temperature of the roots too dramatically and may damage them.

Some other organic compost material may not be beneficial for blueberry bushes due to the possibility that these mulches may raise the pH content of the soil over time. Blueberry bushes need a low pH content to thrive and produce blueberries.

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