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How to Fertilize Citrus Trees in Arizona

Citrus trees flourish in Southwestern areas such as Arizona, and like all plants, need nutrients from fertilizer to grow. Citrus trees are heavy feeders, so it is important to fertilize them a handful of times throughout the year for proper growth, health and fruit production. Keep a couple of important things in mind when fertilizing a citrus tree in Arizona in order to ensure maximum fruit yield and function.

Fertilize citrus trees in Arizona three times a year with the same amount of fertilizer each time, in February, May and August. Do not over-fertilize, as this can make fruit less juicy, with thicker peels. If a citrus tree is growing very rapidly with dark green showing, reduce the amount of fertilizer from three to two times a year.

Choose a fertilizer that has both nitrogen and phosphorous in it to grow for citrus trees.

Follow the exact directions on your particular citrus tree fertilizer's packaging, as different trees and fertilizer have different application directions. Young citrus trees require about 1/2 pound of fertilizer each application, while trees that are 2-3 years old need about 3/4 pound. As the citrus tree gets older than 4 years, fertilizer about 1 1/2 pounds, and for trees older than 6 years, use 2 1/2 pounds.

Put on the heavy gloves, and spread the fertilizer evenly under the citrus tree. Start by the trunk and spread it about 4 feet out from the base of the tree on all sides evenly in a thick layer.

Use a rake after fertilizing to lightly scratch the fertilizer into the top 1/4 inch of the soil. Carefully water the citrus tree in increments of 1 inch, to help the fertilizer completely absorb into the soil.

Fertilize Citrus Trees

To get a good crop of sweet, juicy citrus fruit, the plants need enough to eat. Citrus trees (Citrus spp.) The simplest way to fertilize a citrus tree is to use specially formulated citrus fertilizers. The phosphorus requirements of citrus trees are low, so a good citrus fertilizer will have a nitrogen- and potassium-heavy N-P-K ratio such as 13-7-13. For new, outdoor trees, mix 1-3/4 cups of phosphate fertilizer into the soil at planting time. Citrus trees require yearly nitrogen. The exception is grapefruit (Citrus x paradise), hardy in USDA zones 9 through 11, which requires half this much fertilizer once it is mature, according to the University of Arizona. Required micronutrients may be present in the soil, but keep an eye on the tree for signs of micronutrient deficiency. Use a commercially available, slow-release plant food designed for use with indoor plants, preferably a citrus fertilizer or an all-purpose plant food that contains micronutrients such as iron, magnesium, zinc and boron. For a citrus food with an N-P-K ratio of 5-2-6, use 1 teaspoon of fertilizer for every 4 inches of pot diameter, and mix into the soil.

Fertilize Citrus Trees

To get a good crop of sweet, juicy citrus fruit, the plants need enough to eat. Citrus trees (Citrus spp.) The simplest way to fertilize a citrus tree is to use specially formulated citrus fertilizers. The phosphorus requirements of citrus trees are low, so a good citrus fertilizer will have a nitrogen- and potassium-heavy N-P-K ratio such as 13-7-13. For new, outdoor trees, mix 1-3/4 cups of phosphate fertilizer into the soil at planting time. Citrus trees require yearly nitrogen. The exception is grapefruit (Citrus x paradise), hardy in USDA zones 9 through 11, which requires half this much fertilizer once it is mature, according to the University of Arizona. Required micronutrients may be present in the soil, but keep an eye on the tree for signs of micronutrient deficiency. Use a commercially available, slow-release plant food designed for use with indoor plants, preferably a citrus fertilizer or an all-purpose plant food that contains micronutrients such as iron, magnesium, zinc and boron. For a citrus food with an N-P-K ratio of 5-2-6, use 1 teaspoon of fertilizer for every 4 inches of pot diameter, and mix into the soil.

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