Plan the perfect garden with our interactive tool →

Pecan Trees: Getting Rid of Twig Girdler

Twig girdlers, also called pecan girdlers or long horned girdlers, are insects that cut holes into branches in order to deposit eggs. While they do not completely sever the branches on trees they infest, the damage to the tree is extensive. Branches weaken and fall during heavy winds. Getting rid of twig girdler infestations is essential to protect pecan yield and to prevent infestation of nearby trees.

Look for signs of twig girdler infestation in your pecan tree: Damage caused by the insects is most obvious during the fall, when pecan leaves turn brown and fall from the tree prematurely. There may be a large number of small branches on the ground, beneath the tree. The ends of these branches will appear to have been cut or chewed in a straight line.

Gather any damaged or severed branches and burn them. Make certain to collect the branches that have fallen to the ground, as well as any remaining ones on the tree. This will help eliminate the twig girdler larvae before they develop into adults in the summer.

Collect any fallen branches from nearby trees and inspect for signs of infestation. Twig girdlers spread from tree to tree very quickly.

Shred damaged branches or cut into small pieces and take to a sanitary landfill for disposal, if burning is not legal in your area.

Use an insecticide to control twig girdlers and prevent re-infestation. Products containing azinphosmethyl or EPN are a good choice for controlling twig girdlers on pecan trees. Spray the trees as soon as adults begin to emerge, generally in late summer or early fall, before damage occurs.

Spray your pecan tree again with insecticide during October and November. Remove damaged branches. Use care when pruning, as girdled branches may become deformed.

Spray Pecan Trees With

Here's yet another item to add to the list of things easier said than done: spraying pecan trees (Carya illinoinensis). You could use many different words to describe a pecan tree. And very, very tricky to spray. These diseases don't do in the mighty trees, but they can reduce both their vigor and their nut crop. Pecan scab, caused by the fungus Cladosporium caryigenum, forms spots or on leaves and nut shucks, expanding as the leaves expand. Scab is worse when there is a lot of rainfall and increased hot, humid conditions. But it is only effective if you begin fungicide applications when leaf buds are opening. For homeowners, a preventative fungicide spray program is not a very feasible means of controlling scab. Try a fungicide with the active ingredient "propiconazole." Your pecan tree may also require spraying for zinc deficiencies, said to be common in backyard-grown pecan trees. Symptoms of zinc deficiency include shoot tips with branched twigs and too-small leaves. Apply at bud break and twice more before the middle of June. Pecan pests can also require spraying.

Spray Pecan Trees With

Here's yet another item to add to the list of things easier said than done: spraying pecan trees (Carya illinoinensis). You could use many different words to describe a pecan tree. And very, very tricky to spray. These diseases don't do in the mighty trees, but they can reduce both their vigor and their nut crop. Pecan scab, caused by the fungus Cladosporium caryigenum, forms spots or on leaves and nut shucks, expanding as the leaves expand. Scab is worse when there is a lot of rainfall and increased hot, humid conditions. But it is only effective if you begin fungicide applications when leaf buds are opening. For homeowners, a preventative fungicide spray program is not a very feasible means of controlling scab. Try a fungicide with the active ingredient "propiconazole." Your pecan tree may also require spraying for zinc deficiencies, said to be common in backyard-grown pecan trees. Symptoms of zinc deficiency include shoot tips with branched twigs and too-small leaves. Apply at bud break and twice more before the middle of June. Pecan pests can also require spraying.

Garden Guides
×