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How to Grow Pomegranate

By Sandra Ketcham ; Updated September 21, 2017

Pomegranates are simple to grow and require little maintenance compared to other fruit-bearing plants. They thrive in areas with hot summers and cool winters—and need minimal watering and fertilizing to maintain health and produce fruit. The plants are usually trained into small trees, but they also look lovely when allowed to develop naturally into bushy shrubs. Pomegranate fruit is yellow to vibrant red in color and is a delicious addition to salads and salsas.

Use hardwood cuttings in late winter to start trees with desirable traits. Growing pomegranate from seed rarely produces true-to-type plants. You can use cuttings from an existing tree, or purchase cuttings from your local nursery. Cuttings should be approximately 15 inches long. Treat the cuttings with rooting hormone before planting.

Plant your pomegranate tree in a container after washing away one to two inches of potting medium from the plant's root ball. This will expose the peripheral roots and help ensure successful growth.

Transplant the pomegranate to a sunny outdoor location with well-draining soil. Pomegranates can tolerate partial shade, but the plant should be in full sun to ensure robust fruit production.

Water new plants immediately after planting and every two to three days for several weeks. As the tree becomes established, you can gradually lengthen the time between watering. A fully established tree generally requires watering only once each week.

Fertilize as soon as growth begins using one cup of 8-8-8 fertilizer during the tree's first year. Double the amount of fertilizer you use during the tree's second year, and triple the amount you use during the third year. You can apply the fertilizer once each year, or split applications between spring, summer, and fall.

Harvest pomegranate fruit when it turns red and produces a metallic sound when tapped.

 

Things You Will Need

  • Rooting hormone
  • Large potting container
  • Potting medium
  • 8-8-8 fertilizer

About the Author

 

Sandra Ketcham has nearly two decades of experience writing and editing for major websites and magazines. Her work appears in numerous web and print publications, including "The Atlanta Journal-Constitution," "The Tampa Bay Times," Visit Florida, "USA Today," AOL's Gadling and "Kraze Magazine."