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How to Make a Tin-Can Wind Chime

By Kathryn Hatter ; Updated September 21, 2017
Make a tin-can wind chime for a whimsical garden decoration.

Wind chimes can make a dainty clink in a light breeze or a deeper clang that lets you know when the wind picks up in your garden. Experiment with a rustic approach and try making your own wind chimes from old tin cans.

Remove any paper wrapping on the outside of the tin cans. Wash the inside of the cans well and dry them. Use the metal file to buff away any sharp edges on the cans.

Paint the outside of the tin cans with acrylic paint. Make them one color or splash an assortment of bright colors onto them. Allow the paint to dry completely.

Use a nail to make a hole in the bottom of the cans, directly in the center. Pound the nail through the cans with a hammer, then pull the nail out.

Cut a 3-foot length of nylon cord and burn both ends with a lighter to seal them. Thread one end of the cord through the bottom hole of the larger can. Place the can so that approximately 1 foot of cord extends out the bottom. This will be the top of the wind chime (the can should be upside down). Place one locking toggle onto the short end of the cord and position it just above the can to hold it in place.

Slide another locking toggle onto the long end of the cord and push it up so that it stops when it rests against the inside bottom of the large can. This will hold the can in place along the cord. Slide another locking toggle onto the long end of the cord and push it up so that it is just under the large can.

Insert the long end of the cord through the hole in the smaller can (which is upside down) and position the can so that it stops at the locking toggle you just added. Add the fourth locking toggle onto the cord and push it up so that it stops when it rests against the inside bottom of the smaller can. Now both cans are securely in place on the cord with the locking toggles.

Add the large wooden bead and push it up so that it is even with the bottom of the smaller can. Place the last locking toggle onto the cord and push it up just under the bead so that it will hold the bead in place.

Tie a loop in the other end of the cord for hanging the wind chime. Find a spot where it can catch the wind.

 

Things You Will Need

  • Two tin cans (of graduated size)
  • Heavy-duty nail
  • Hammer
  • Nylon cord
  • Five locking toggles (see Resources)
  • Large wooden bead
  • Acrylic paint
  • Paintbrush
  • Metal file
  • Lighter

About the Author

 

Kathryn Hatter is a veteran home-school educator, as well as an accomplished gardener, quilter, crocheter, cook, decorator and digital graphics creator. As a regular contributor to Natural News, many of Hatter's Internet publications focus on natural health and parenting. Hatter has also had publication on home improvement websites such as Redbeacon.