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Facts About Apple Trees

Apple trees offer a beautiful addition to backyard garden areas and landscaping. Not only gorgeous with their sweeping branches and bright blossoms, apple trees also function as a source of food with its delicious varieties of apple fruit.

Planting

Apple trees grow well in most soil conditions. Northern states should plant in early spring, while southern state trees do better planted in the fall.

Varieties

Dozens of varieties of apple trees exist with each tree's individual fruit production, decided by the rootstalk or bottom of the young tree. You can choose varieties by their use such as eventual fruit to eat directly or use for baking and cooking.

Pollination

Apple trees cannot self pollinate or pollinate with other apple trees. Instead, the trees rely on pollination of apple blossoms by bees.

  • Apple trees offer a beautiful addition to backyard garden areas and landscaping.
  • Dozens of varieties of apple trees exist with each tree's individual fruit production, decided by the rootstalk or bottom of the young tree.

Pests

Pests attack apple trees frequently. Apple maggots, green fruit worms and aphids are a few of the most common pests. Trees usually require yearly spraying of pesticides to avoid serious damage.

Fun Fact

Apple trees do not bear apples until reaching 4 of 5 years old. On rare occasions, 200-year-old trees might still bear fruit.

Apple Trees

Plan to prune your mature apple trees in the late dormant season, generally February to April. Cut off all branches that cross or rub together. Spurs grow only about 1/2 inch per year, and their production lessens after one decade. Direct the growth of each young apple tree by bending its branches horizontally for several weeks. Continue to do this task throughout the year to prevent pest problems. Faster-growing apple trees probably don't need nitrogen; so when their new growth appears in early spring, supply each of them with 1 pound of sulfate of potash per every 5 bushels of apples you harvested the past year. Apply most fertilizers by sprinkling them evenly on the ground at the base of the tree trunks, and then water that ground well. The application method may differ among fertilizer brands. Spray the apple trees with an application of dormant oil before buds appear in spring. The wire cylinders protect against vole and mouse damage. Embed the bottom of each cylinder about 1 inch into the soil. Leave about 4 inches between fruits.

  • Plan to prune your mature apple trees in the late dormant season, generally February to April.
  • Apply most fertilizers by sprinkling them evenly on the ground at the base of the tree trunks, and then water that ground well.

Apple Trees

Plan to prune your mature apple trees in the late dormant season, generally February to April. Cut off all branches that cross or rub together. Spurs grow only about 1/2 inch per year, and their production lessens after one decade. Direct the growth of each young apple tree by bending its branches horizontally for several weeks. Continue to do this task throughout the year to prevent pest problems. Faster-growing apple trees probably don't need nitrogen; so when their new growth appears in early spring, supply each of them with 1 pound of sulfate of potash per every 5 bushels of apples you harvested the past year. Apply most fertilizers by sprinkling them evenly on the ground at the base of the tree trunks, and then water that ground well. The application method may differ among fertilizer brands. Spray the apple trees with an application of dormant oil before buds appear in spring. The wire cylinders protect against vole and mouse damage. Embed the bottom of each cylinder about 1 inch into the soil. Leave about 4 inches between fruits.

  • Plan to prune your mature apple trees in the late dormant season, generally February to April.
  • Apply most fertilizers by sprinkling them evenly on the ground at the base of the tree trunks, and then water that ground well.

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