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How to Grow Aloe Vera Plants From a Cutting

Aloe vera is a succulent plant that is widely recognized as having healing properties. Many people choose to grow an aloe vera plant in the home so that they will have the beneficial aloe available to treat burns and other skin ailments when needed. When you have one aloe plant, propagating another aloe plant from the original plant is a very simple procedure.

Prepare the planting container by filling it with potting soil.

Use the garden shears to remove a 4-inch cutting from one of the aloe vera leaves.

Insert the cutting into the dirt to the halfway point on the cutting with the cut end going in first. Water the cutting generously and place it in a location where it will receive indirect natural light.

Water the cutting every other day for one month to keep the soil moist. After one month, water the cutting only once per month. Expect the leaf to shrivel somewhat during this time but do not give in to the temptation to water more than once per month.

Keep the new aloe vera plant in a warm spot with indirect light. Water enough to saturate the soil and then allow it to dry completely before watering again.

Transplant to a sunny location outdoors if the temperature will stay above freezing. If the outdoor temperature will not stay above freezing year-round, keep the aloe vera as an indoor plant.

Aloe Vera Plants Flower?

They can be found in clay pots on porches, in cheery windowsill boxes and winding their way through cactus gardens. The aloe vera flowers that appear on some of the 500 species of this short-stemmed shrub can be difficult to propagate. The gel that oozes from the stems when they are snapped open is known to be a natural antibacterial substance. The blooms tend to emerge in early spring and can last through the summer. Aloe begins in a tight rosette and grows to a spiky cacti with branches that can stretch and twist toward the much-needed sunlight for which it thirsts. Once the rosette of a young aloe vera plant begins to turn into fat stems that stretch out from the center of the plant, it will be ready to bloom. If you are set on seeing lush blossoms from your aloe vera plant, there are a few things you can do to initiate bloom beginnings. Place the plant outside if you want big, bright blooms. The stubby and sturdy aloe vera plant is made up of 99 percent water. Its remaining 1 percent is brimming with antioxidants, anti-inflammatory compounds, skin-enhancing enzymes for repair and wrinkle reduction, amino acids, minerals, vitamins and nutrients.

Aloe Vera Plants Flower?

They can be found in clay pots on porches, in cheery windowsill boxes and winding their way through cactus gardens. The aloe vera flowers that appear on some of the 500 species of this short-stemmed shrub can be difficult to propagate. The gel that oozes from the stems when they are snapped open is known to be a natural antibacterial substance. The blooms tend to emerge in early spring and can last through the summer. Aloe begins in a tight rosette and grows to a spiky cacti with branches that can stretch and twist toward the much-needed sunlight for which it thirsts. Once the rosette of a young aloe vera plant begins to turn into fat stems that stretch out from the center of the plant, it will be ready to bloom. If you are set on seeing lush blossoms from your aloe vera plant, there are a few things you can do to initiate bloom beginnings. Place the plant outside if you want big, bright blooms. The stubby and sturdy aloe vera plant is made up of 99 percent water. Its remaining 1 percent is brimming with antioxidants, anti-inflammatory compounds, skin-enhancing enzymes for repair and wrinkle reduction, amino acids, minerals, vitamins and nutrients.

Tip

If you intend to plant the new aloe vera plant outdoors in the ground eventually, fill the planting container with soil from the outdoor growing area. This will force the plant to grow accustomed to the soil from the start and will eliminate any transplant shock after you move the cutting outside.

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