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How to Flock the Pool

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Flocking the pool is essentially the introduction of a certain chemical compound that binds with floating debris in pool water. This debris literally clouds up the water and can be anything from algae to dirt or any number of minute particles that are not captured by the filtering system. Although a chlorine shock treatment will also cure many types of cloudy water, flocking a pool is less caustic and a less expensive alternative that won't upset the pH water balance, yet will achieve the same results.

Acquire a container of pool flocking chemical. These are available at pool and spa supply stores or online.

Add the flocking chemical to your pool water. Manufacturers recommendations about dosage will vary, but expect to add about 8 ounces of flocking chemical per 10,000 gallons of pool water.

Allow the flocking chemical to bind the particles that are suspended in the water. Once bound, they will sink to the bottom of the pool. This action may take between 24 and 36 hours depending upon the amount of chemical used and how bad the water was clouded.

Vacuum the pool when all of the particles have sunk to the bottom. A good sign will be when the water itself has become crystal clear once again.

Flock For A Swimming Pool

Swimming pool owners have an important goal when it comes to their pools: maintaining crystal-clear, sanitary water. When cloudiness becomes severe, or there is an algae problem, it may be necessary to add a flocculent. When you shock the pool to get rid of algae or other organic matter, the residue includes dead algae, as well as other particulate matter that escapes filtration. If the water is only mildly cloudy, it's better to stick with the clarifier, which coagulates contaminants into smaller particles that the pool filter can remove. Most commercial pool flocculants contain aluminum sulfate, or alum, which has been used as a water clarifier for centuries. If you choose one of these, consult the container for the proper amount to use. Backwash the pool filters before flocking, then broadcast the floc over the water. Then turn the pump off, and leave it off for 12 to 24 hours. Large particles of sediment that you can vacuum away will sink to the bottom of the swimming pool.

Flock For A Swimming Pool

Swimming pool owners have an important goal when it comes to their pools: maintaining crystal-clear, sanitary water. When cloudiness becomes severe, or there is an algae problem, it may be necessary to add a flocculent. When you shock the pool to get rid of algae or other organic matter, the residue includes dead algae, as well as other particulate matter that escapes filtration. If the water is only mildly cloudy, it's better to stick with the clarifier, which coagulates contaminants into smaller particles that the pool filter can remove. Most commercial pool flocculants contain aluminum sulfate, or alum, which has been used as a water clarifier for centuries. If you choose one of these, consult the container for the proper amount to use. Backwash the pool filters before flocking, then broadcast the floc over the water. Then turn the pump off, and leave it off for 12 to 24 hours. Large particles of sediment that you can vacuum away will sink to the bottom of the swimming pool.

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