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How to Dry Gerbera Daisies

Gerbera daisies come in a range of bright colors, including red and pinks, yellows and oranges. You can simply let gerbera daisies air dry by hanging them upside down in a cool, dry place, but microwave drying them with silica gel will help preserve their vivid colors. Silica gel is available in craft stores. Silica gel can be a good investment if you intend to dry a lot of flowers, since you can reuse it after it’s completely cooled. Some silica gel is made to change color as it dries, making it easier to tell when the drying process is complete.

Dry Gerbera Daisies

Cut the stems of the gerbera daisies so they’re short enough to fit in your microwave dish. Remove any leaves from the stems.

Put one to two inches of silica gel in the microwave-safe glass dish, so that the dish is completely covered.

Place a few gerbera daisies in the dish, blossom side down, without letting them touch.

Cover the gerbera daisies with silica gel. Be careful not to bend the petals out of shape, but make sure to cover them completely.

Place the dish with the silica gel and gerbera daisies in the microwave. Place the cup of water in the back corner of the microwave.

Microwave the gerbera daisies for about two or three minutes, using a low temperature setting if your microwave has one. (The time may vary depending on the type of microwave and the particular batch of flowers, so you’ll need to experiment.)

Remove the dish from the microwave using oven mitts and place it on a hot pad or tile counter. Let the dish and the silica gel cool completely.

Remove the dried gerbera daisies. Gently brush off the silica gel.

Use the silica to try more gerbera daisies, if desired. Adjust the microwave time as needed.

Tip

After you dry them, you may want to wire the stems of the gerbera daisies to strengthen them and make arranging them easier.

Warning

Use caution when working with hot materials.

Do not eat silica gel, and do not use the glass dish for food after you’ve used it for drying flowers.

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