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What are the Best T8 Bulbs for Growing Plants?

By Jonathan Budzinski ; Updated September 21, 2017
Flourescent lights are necessary tools in providing indoor plants with enough energy to sustain all biological functions.
flourescent light image by Freeze Frame Photography from Fotolia.com

T8 fluorescent lights are highly treasured equipment in the development of indoor gardeners, where price is often weighed against performance. Lower wattage fixtures are often purchased to combat expensive varieties that offer much higher lumen output. Gardeners must ensure that their lights offer enough energy to sustain proper photosynthesis for long periods of time.

Philips Aquarelle

Philips Aquarelle fluorescent lights are stated as one of the best T8 bulbs in value, cost, energy efficiency and color rendering. These bulbs stimulate oxygen output in plants. The bulbs contain mercury vapory fluorescence and can produce around 10,000 Kelvins.

Sylvania Aquastar Fluorescent Tube

Specifically designed to promote the growth of aquatic plants with red and blue light emissions, Sylvania Aquastar lights produce 10,000 Kelvins in 15-, 18-, 30- and 36-watt varieties. They are well known to help in the development of indoor coral growth.

Interpet Aquatic

Interpet Aquatic T8 bulbs are designed for growing plants without the same levels of mercury per tube, resulting in less hazardous light emissions. 36-watt bulbs produce enough natural light to promote plant growth at around 6,000 Kelvins; noticeably lower than other varieties. These bulbs have some of the best light-output ratios available on the market.

 

About the Author

 

Jonathan Budzinski started his writing career in 2007. His work appears on websites such as WordGigs. Budzinski specializes in nonprofit topics as he spent two years working with Basic Rights Oregon and WomanSpace. He has received recognition as a Shining Star Talent Scholar in English while studying English at the University of Oregon.